Skip to: |

Newegg.com - A great place to buy computers, computer parts, electronics, software, accessories, and DVDs online. With great prices, fast shipping, and top-rated customer service - once you know, you Newegg.

If you are reading this message, Please click this link to reload this page.(Do not use your browser's "Refresh" button). Please email us if you're running the latest version of your browser and you still see this message.

Newegg.com - Computer Parts, Laptops, Electronics, HDTVs, Digital Cameras and More!

Sign up today for a 30-day free trial of Newegg Premier
  • | Wish List
  • Help
Search all
Search
Home
Home > 
Computer Hardware > 
Motherboards > 
Embedded Solutions > 
Intel > 
Item#: N82E16813121792

Intel Galileo1 Development Board

  • Intel Quark SoC X1000 Application Processor
  • 10/100 Ethernet connector
  • Full PCI Express mini-card slot
ICON Loading...

 

 

 

Intel® Galileo board

New Tools for Innovation


Introducing the Intel® Galileo development board, the first product in a new family of Arduino*-compatible development boards featuring Intel® architecture. The platform is easy to use for new designers and for those looking to take designs to the next level. Intel recognizes that the people who take creating beautiful things into their own hands with innovation and technology are the same ones that propel us forward.

 
The Intel® Galileo board features a flexible, low-power, 400MHz Quark SoC X-1000.

The Intel Galileo development board is a great tool for quickly prototyping simple, interactive designs such as LED light displays that respond to social media, or for tackling more complex projects, from automating home appliances to building life-size robots controlled by a smartphone.

This platform provides the ease of Intel architecture development through support for the Microsoft Windows*, Mac OS* and Linux* host operating systems. It also brings the simplicity of the Arduino software integrated development environment (IDE). It's all about delivering Intel performance and quality to the DIY maker community—to support invention and creativity.

Overview

Galileo is a microcontroller board based on the Intel® Quark SoC X-1000. Application Processor, a 32-bit Intel Pentium-class system on a chip. It's the first board based on Intel® architecture designed to be hardware and software pin-compatible with Arduino shields designed for the Uno R3. Digital pins 0 to 13 (and the adjacent AREF and GND pins), Analog inputs 0 to 5, the power header, ICSP header, and the UART port pins (0 and 1), are all in the same locations as on the Arduino Uno R3. This is also known as the Arduino 1.0 pinout.

Galileo is designed to support shields that operate at either 3.3V or 5V. The core operating voltage of Galileo is 3.3V. However, a jumper on the board enables voltage translation to 5V at the I/O pins. This provides support for 5V Uno shields and is the default behavior. By switching the jumper position, the voltage translation can be disabled to provide 3.3V operation at the I/O pins.

Galileo board is also software compatible with the Arduino Software Development Environment (IDE), which makes usability and introduction a snap. In addition to Arduino hardware and software compatibility, the Galileo board has several PC industry standard I/O ports and features to expand native usage and capabilities beyond the Arduino shield ecosystem. A full-sized mini-PCI Express slot, 100MB Ethernet port, Micro-SD slot, RS-232 serial port, USB Host port, USB Client port, and 8MB NOR flash come standard on the board.

Details of Intel Architecture Supported Features

The genuine Intel processor and surrounding native I/O capabilities of the Clanton SoC provides for a fully featured offering for both the maker community and students alike. It will also be useful to professional developers who are looking for a simple and cost-effective development environment to the more complex Intel® Atom processor and Intel® Core processor-based designs.

  • 400MHz 32-bit Intel® Pentium instruction set architecture (ISA)-compatible processor
    • 16 KB on-die L1 cache
    • 512 KB of on-die embedded SRAM
    • Simple to program: Single thread, single core, constant speed
    • ACPI compatible CPU sleep states supported
    • An integrated Real Time Clock (RTC), with an optional 3V "coin cell" battery for operation between turn on cycles.
  • 10/100 Ethernet connector
  • Full PCI Express* mini-card slot, with PCIe 2.0 compliant features
    • Works with half mini-PCIe cards with optional converter plate
    • Provides USB 2.0 Host Port at mini-PCIe connector
  • USB 2.0 Host connector
    • Support up to 128 USB end point devices
  • USB Device connector, used for programming
    • Beyond just a programming port - a fully compliant USB 2.0 Device controller
  • 10-pin Standard JTAG header for debugging
  • Reboot button to reboot the processor
  • Reset button to reset the sketch and any attached shields
  • Storage options:
    • Default - 8 MB Legacy SPI Flash main purpose is to store the firmware (or bootloader) and the latest sketch. Between 256KB and 512KB is dedicated for sketch storage. The download will happen automatically from the development PC, so no action is required unless there is an upgrade that is being added to the firmware.
    • Default 512 KB embedded SRAM, enabled by the firmware by default. No action required to use this feature.
    • Default 256 MB DRAM, enabled by the firmware by default.
    • Optional microSD card offers up to 32GB of storage
    • USB storage works with any USB 2.0 compatible drive
    • 11 KB EEPROM can be programmed via the EEPROM library.

Power

Galileo is powered via an AC-to-DC adapter, connected by plugging a 2.1mm center-positive plug into the board's power jack. The recommended output rating of the power adapter is 5V at up to 3A.

Specifications

Electrical SummaryTable HeaderTable HeaderTable Header
Input Voltage (recommended) 5V
Input Voltage (limits) 5V
Digital I/O Pins 14 (six provide PWM output)
Analog Input Pins 6
Total DC Output Current on all I/O lines 80mA
DC Current for 3.3V Pin 800mA
DC Current for 5V Pin 800mA

Communication

Galileo has a number of facilities for communicating with a computer, another Arduino, or other microcontrollers. Galileo provides UART TTL (5V/3.3V) serial communication, which is available on digital pin 0 (RX) and 1 (TX). In addition, a second UART provides RS-232 support and is connected via a 3.5mm jack. The USB Device ports allows for serial (CDC) communications over USB. This provides a serial connection to the serial monitor or other applications on your computer. It also enables Galileo to act as a USB mouse or keyboard to an attached computer. To use these features, see the mouse and keyboard library reference pages. The USB host port allows Galileo act as a USB host for connected peripherals such as mice, keyboards, and smartphones. To use these features, see the USB host reference pages.

Galileo is the first Arduino board to provide a mini PCI express (mPCIe) slot. This slot allows full size and half size (with adapter) mPCIe modules to be connected to the board and also provides an additional USB Host port via the slot. Any standard mPCIe module can be connected and used to provide applications such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth or cellular connectivity. Initially, the Galileo mPCie slot provides support for the Wi-Fi Library. For additional information, see the Intel® Galileo Getting Started Guide.

An Ethernet RJ45 connector is provided to allow Galileo to connect to wired networks. When connecting to a network, you must provide an IP address and a MAC address. Full support of on-board Ethernet interface is fully supported and does not require the use of the SPI interface like existing Arduino shields. The onboard microSD card reader is accessible through the SD Library. The communication between Galileo and the SD card is provided by an integrated SD controller and does not require the use of the SPI interface like other Arduino boards. The Arduino software includes a wire library to simplify use of the TWI/I2C bus; see the documentation for details. For SPI communication use the SPI library.

Properties of Pins Configured as OUTPUT

On Galileo, when a pin is configured as OUTPUT, the functionality is provided via an I2C-based Cypress I/O expander. Digital pins 0 to 13 and Analog pins A0 to A5 can be configured as OUTPUT pins on Galileo.

The I/O expander's pins, when configured as OUTPUT, can source (provide positive current) up to 10 mA (milliamps) and can sink (provide negative current) up to 25mA of current to other devices/circuits. The individual per pin current sourcing capability of 10mA is subject to an overall limit of 80mA combined between all OUTPUT pins. The per pin capability current sinking capability is subject to an overall limit of 200mA. The following table provides a breakdown of the overall OUTPUT capabilities of the pins.
  Current Source (mA) Current Source (mA)
Per Pin Capability 10 25
Digital Pins 3,5,9,10,12, 13 Combined 40 100
Digital Pins 0,1,2,4,6,7,8,11 and Analog Pins A0,A1,A2,A3,A4, A5 Combined 40 100
Digital Pins 0-13 and Analog Pins A0-A5 Combined 80 200

Programming

Galileo can be programmed with the Arduino software. When you are ready to upload the sketch to the board, program Galileo through the USB client port by selecting "Intel Galileo" as your board in the Arduino IDE. Connect Galileo's port labelled USB client (the one closest to the Ethernet) to your computer. For details, see the reference, tutorials and the Intel® Galileo Getting Started Guide. Rather than requiring a physical press of the reset button before an upload, Galileo is designed to be reset by software running on a connected computer.

When the board boots up two scenarios are possible:

  • If a sketch is present in persistent storage, it is executed
  • If no sketch present, the board waits for upload commands from the IDE

If a sketch is executing, you can upload from the IDE without having to press the reset button on the board. The sketch is stopped; the IDE waits for the upload state, and then starts the newly uploaded sketch. Pressing the reset button on the board restarts a sketch if it is executing and resets any attached shields.

Galileo Jumper Configuration

There are three jumpers on Galileo that are used to vary the configuration of the board.

IOREF Jumper

To allow Galileo support both 3.3V and 5V shields, the external operating voltage is controlled via a jumper. When the jumper is connected to 5V, Galileo is configured to be compatible with 5V shields and IOREF is set to 5V. When the jumper is connected 3.3V, Galileo is configured to be compatible with 3.3V shields and IOREF is set to 3.3V. The input range of the analog pins is also controlled by the IOREF jumper and must not exceed the chosen operating voltage. However, the resolution of analogRead() remains at 5V/1024 units for the default 10-bit resolution or, 0.0049V (4.9mV) per unit regardless of IOREF jumper setting.

Warning: The IOREF jumper should be used to match the board and shield operating voltages. Incorrectly setting the voltage could damage the board or the shield.

I2C* Address Jumper

To prevent a clash between the I2C* Slave address of the on board I/O expander and EEPROM with any external I2C* Slave devices, jumper J2 can be used to vary the I2C* address of the on-board devices. With J2 connected to pin 1 (marked with white triangle), the 7-bit I/O Expander address is 0100001 and the 7-bit EEPROM address is 1010001. Changing the jumper position changes the I/O expander address to 0100000 and the EEPROM address to 1010000.

VIN Jumper

On Galileo, the VIN pin can be used to supply 5V from the regulated power supply connected at the power jack to attached shields or devices. If there is a need to supply more than 5V to a shield using VIN then the VIN jumper should be removed from Galileo to break the connection between the on-board 5V supply and the VIN connection on the board header.

Warning: If the VIN jumper is not removed and more than 5V is connected to VIN, it may damage the board or lead to unreliable operation.

Automatic (Software) Reset

Rather than requiring a physical press of the reset button before an upload, Galileo is designed in a way that allows it to be reset by software running on a connected computer. USB CDC-ACM control signals are used to transition Galileo from run-time to bootloader mode. The Arduino software uses this capability to allow you to upload code by simply pressing the upload button in the Arduino environment.

Physical Characteristics

Galileo is 4.2-inches long and 2.8-inches wide respectively, with the USB connectors, UART jack, Ethernet connector, and power jack extending beyond the former dimension. Four screw holes allow the board to be attached to a surface or case. Note that the distance between digital pins 7 and 8 is 160 mil (0.16"), is not an even multiple of the 100mil spacing of the other pins.

Learn more about the Intel Galileo1

Model

Brand
Intel
Model
Galileo1

Bundle

CPU
Intel Quark SoC X1000 Application Processor

Expansion Slots

Mini Card Slots
1 x Mini PCIe

Onboard LAN

LAN Speed
10/100Mbps

Physical Spec

Dimensions
4.2" x 2.8"

Features

Features
400MHz 32-bit Intel Pentium instruction set architecture (ISA)-compatible processor
-16 KByte L1 cache
-512 KBytes of on-die embedded SRAM
-Simple t-program: Single thread, single core, constant speed
-ACPI compatible CPU sleep states supported
-An integrated Real Time Clock (RTC), with an optional 3V "coin cell" battery for operation between turn on cycles.

10/100 Ethernet connector

Full PCI Express mini-card slot, with PCIe 2.0 compliant features
-Works with half mini-PCIe cards with optional converter plate
-Provides USB 2.0 Host Port at mini-PCIe connector

USB 2.0 Host connector
-Support up to 128 USB end point devices

USB Client connector, used for programming
-Beyond just a programming port - a fully compliant USB 2.0 Device controller

10-pin Standard JTAG header for debugging

Reboot button to reboot the processor

Reset button to reset the sketch and any attached shields

Storage options:
-8 MByte Legacy SPI Flash whose main purpose is to store the firmware (or bootloader) and the latest sketch. Between 256 KByte and 512 KByte is dedicated for sketch storage. The upload happens automatically from the development PC, so no action is required unless there is an upgrade that is being added to the firmware.
-512 KByte embedded SRAM that is enabled by the firmware by default.
-256 MByte DRAM, enabled by the firmware by default.
-Optional micr-SD card offers up to 32GByte of storage
-USB storage works with any USB 2.0 compatible drive
-11 KByte EEPROM can be programmed via the EEPROM library.

Quick Info

Warranty

  • Limited Warranty period (parts): 1 year
  • Limited Warranty period (labor): 1 year


Customer Reviews of the Intel Galileo1

Do you own this product? Write a Review

ICON Loading...

Filter Results

Go
  • Daniel F.
  • 1/14/2014 5:08:30 PM
  • Tech Level: High
  • Ownership: 1 week to 1 month
  • Verified Owner

4 out of 5 eggsStrange board, but worth a shot

Pros: It was very easy to get up and started. While there isn't much information available, Intel did a good job being beginner friendly.
It runs a real OS (Linux) and has good USB, PCIe, SPI, I2C and IO pins.
It has a RTC

Cons: The Linux version is very limited.
There is no VGA, HDMI or any video / audio support.
It is marketed as an Arduino board but the basic Arduino can do faster IO on digital pins.
The RTC requires a battery-holder to be added. The whole point of an integrated RTC is to not have to add anything for it. This is easy enough to add, but an odd omission.

Other Thoughts: It is hard to categorize this board. It is not a PC, nor is it a Raspberry PI type. It is targeted as Arduino but it has the potential to be so much more. It has a very rich assortment of IO features. Also the x86 instruction set has a history of great dev tools. It runs Linux with user-mode applications doing IO through drivers. Yet, Intel supports a very limited development tool (Arduino) and a very limited Linux distribution.

There are a lot of cool things about this product, just don't expect too much of it. I hope Intel will provide more Quark products soon.

The board has a lot of potential. It could really be great, but right now it is only good.

7 out of 7 people found this review helpful. Did you? Yes No

  • Robert M.
  • 1/12/2014 8:33:10 AM
  • Tech Level: High
  • Ownership: 1 week to 1 month
  • Verified Owner

5 out of 5 eggsComplete

Pros: Package includes everything Intel intended. Getting started writeup was a leftover from maker faire. Great service on a great product. Not for beginners. If you are just getting started get a Uno. Can run full Linux - fast. Build your own image with Yocto support. WiFi cheap to add.

Cons: Extremely slow io pins. Very early support from Intel. Expect software bugs. No GPU, so console io only.

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful. Did you? Yes No

  • Eric F.
  • 1/11/2014 6:06:42 PM
  • Tech Level: High
  • Ownership: 1 day to 1 week
  • Verified Owner

3 out of 5 eggsBeagleBone Black is better

Pros: Physically compatible with Arduino Shields
Uses Arduino development environment
Emulated Arduino libraries
Has Linux on board
Ability to run linux commands, use ethernet, ... from Arduino development

Cons: IO ports are not on the SOC, so are slow
Linux is very barebones, even when updated with complete image
Documentation is sparse
Nonstandard RS-232 connection
Network connection to Ethernet doesn't
Hotter and more power than Beablebone or Raspberry Pi
Many things (ssh, sketch persistence) don't work unless you use the microSD distribution of Linux.
The USB host port is a micro sized so requires an adapter for things like flash drives, etc.

Other Thoughts: The hardware is basically 400 MHz Pentium SOC with 256 MB of memory, Ethernet and USB ports (one host, one client for use with Arduino). It has 8 MB of flash onboard that runs a very barbones version of Linux (no ssh, but has telnetd that doesn't start). The arduino hardware ports are emulated by some I2C chips. This limits the speed of the connections on many of the ports. It does have nice emulation of the Arduino libraries and physical connections. So, most shields and sketches should work (I haven't tried very many). The sketch is compiled and run by the SOC: there is no AVR on board. It actually goes as an elf executable in the /sketch directory. When booting from the onboard flash things run out of ram so the sketch isn't persistent across linux boots (or power resets). The linux image is very barebones: basically busybox and a few essential utilities. There isn't room for sshd, though there is a telnetd that you can start manually. You can execute linux commands using the system call in your sketches. In fact, you have to do either this or use the Arduino ethernet library to get the Ethernet to work. There is an RS-232 serial port that serves as the linux console. Unfortunately, it uses an audio jack and that cable isn't included. You need a USB-to-RS232 converter an a specialized 9-pin audio cable that is nonstandard. You can buy them for <$10 on the web, but I really think it should be included because it is a pain to have to wait. Alternatively you can start telnetd and connect over ethernet (after telling issuing an ifconfig or otherwise starting the Ethernet). There is a downloadable image that is available from Intel that can be installed on a microSD card. Installation is really easy since it goes on a FAT formatted card. However, the Linux is really bare bones No development tools, no pacakge manager, etc. It does include python and some libraries for controlling the various IO pins. My experience is that it uses about 4W at idle, about twice the power consumption of a BeagleBone Black or Raspberry Pi. Compared to the Raspberry Pi, it has no hdmi, but does have some Analog IO and can use Arduino Shields. it costs a bit more than the RPi Model B and has less memory. The BeagleBone Black costs a bit less and has both analog and digital IO, though is not compatible with Arduino Shields or the Arduino environemtn. The Beaglebone runs a Debian distribution that is full featured. Frankly think that the BeagleBone Black is more useful unless you really need the Arduino capability. In that case, though I haven't used it yet, I think I the Arduino Yun seems it might be better for Arduino compatibility. One really interesting capability is that it has a mini PCI-E port. Could be useful for things other than simple Wireless. Also, I suspect this platform will mature unless Intel abandons it.

5 out of 6 people found this review helpful. Did you? Yes No

  • Eric F.
  • 1/11/2014 5:43:09 PM
  • Tech Level: High
  • Ownership: 1 day to 1 week
  • Verified Owner

1 out of 5 eggsDisappointed

Pros: Nice and small
Linux drivers available

Cons: No brackets to mount in half-mini pci-e slot.
No antenna or cables

Other Thoughts: Got this as part of a bundle with Intel Galileo board, as mentioned previously. It does not come with the brackets needed to mount it, nor with an antenna. I contacted NewEgg about the brackets and they said it was bought as part of a bundle with a discount (which I new) and that they don't guarantee compatibility of bundle items. I find that a little disappointing. Caveat emptor.

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful. Did you? Yes No

  • Kevin S.
  • 12/31/2013 10:03:51 AM
  • Tech Level: High
  • Ownership: less than 1 day
  • Verified Owner

2 out of 5 eggsMIssing parts

Pros: Great high powered, high memory alternative to the Arduino

Cons: THIS KIT DOES NOT COME WITH THE USB CABLE, MOUNTING SCREWS or STANDOFFS specified in the "Intel Quick Start Guide" make sure you know what you are ordering.

2 out of 14 people found this review helpful. Did you? Yes No

ICON Loading...
Are you an E-Blast Insider? Subscribe Newegg e-Blast
PayPal
Shop without retyping payment details. Secure shopping made faster.
Check out with PayPal.

Home
Home > 
Computer Hardware > 
Motherboards > 
Embedded Solutions > 
Intel > 
Item#: N82E16813121792
Shop by Region: United States | Canada | China
VeriSign Click for the BBB Business Review of this Computers - Supplies & Parts in Whittier CAThis site protected by Trustwave's Trusted Commerce program Inc500
Policy & Agreement | Privacy Policy  © 2000-2014 Newegg Inc.  All rights reserved.
If the Adobe Reader does not appear when you click on a link for a PDF file, you can download Adobe Reader from the Adobe web site. nassau