Skip to: |

Newegg.com - A great place to buy computers, computer parts, electronics, software, accessories, and DVDs online. With great prices, fast shipping, and top-rated customer service - once you know, you Newegg.

If you are reading this message, Please click this link to reload this page.(Do not use your browser's "Refresh" button). Please email us if you're running the latest version of your browser and you still see this message.

Newegg.com - Computer Parts, Laptops, Electronics, HDTVs, Digital Cameras and More!

Sign up today for a 30-day free trial of Newegg Premier
  • Shipping Destination: United States
  • Wish List
  • Feedback
  • Help
Search all
Search
Home
Home > 
Gregory P.'s Profile > 
All Reviews
  • Find Reviews
  • Find

Showing Results: Most Recent

D-Link DCS-5009L Pan/Tilt Day/Night Motion Detection Wireless Cloud IP Camera
  • eggxpert iconEggXpert
  • Owned For: 1 day to 1 week

5 out of 5 eggs Good Sub-100 buck IP cam 09/14/2014

This review is from: D-Link DCS-5009L Pan/Tilt Day/Night Motion Detection Wireless Cloud IP Camera

Pros: D-Link’s apparent goal with its entire product line is “Zero Configuration”. They try to make this camera easy to set up for the technologically challenged when it comes to networks, routers, port-forwarding, dynamic DNS, firewalls, and such - so that the video can be viewed remotely from outside your local network with no real setup effort.

Their solution is something called mydlink and the company’s eventual goal is to break into the smart home market with various modules that started with cameras and routers. The assumption is that a sub 100 buck camera with easy setup will trump something more technologically advanced with a more difficult setup. They are probably right. Explanation of security trade-offs are in “other thoughts”.

Three documented setup methods:
1) Own a D-link “Cloud enabled” router, hook up the camera to the network, log into your mydlink account and click “Yes” to add the camera.
2) Download “Setup Wizard” from the internet (Mac & Windows), follow instructions which may include installing Java if you don’t have it.
3) Do it all manually using the camera’s built in Web Configuration Utility– you may need to download the user manual from internet. The default IP if no DHCP is 192 168 0 20.

Android and iOS apps for viewing and controlling camera are available. The ipad iOS app that allows multiple camera display is not free. The one camera version iPhone/iPad app “mydlink Lite” is free. It has had some prior bad reviews but I liked the current version. It also allowed associating a wireless local camera that I manually set up to a mydlink account without having to download a Setup Wizard to the desktop. Through the portal on default settings and the cam on wireless I got 8.5 FPS MJPEG 480P on the iOS app. The support site has some instructional videos, some sample video, and an emulation of the Web Configuration Utility.

I tested full manual set-up, e-mailing of snapshots & video clips to a gmail account on a time schedule, e-mail notification based on the motion detection's 5 x 5 grid, uploads to an FTP server, remote access via port-forwarding, audio, and DDNS function. You can store up to 24 preset pan/tilt settings. Bonjour is supported as well as UPnP. H.264 bitrate can be specified. All the functions worked fine for me. Firmware is still on the 1.00 version.

Cons: The trend in network cameras is going to HD/megapixel resolution.

This is D-Link’s lower resolution camera but it is priced correctly for what you get. Limitations compared to a more expensive model: Max resolution is 640 x 480 (CMOS VGA) at 15 fps using either H.264 or MJPEG. Documentation states the resolution for the remote portal is QVGA (320 x 240) but I seemed to get 480P on the free iOS app. Lens focus is manual. There is no optical zoom. Wireless n is single channel (150N). There is no in-camera storage (like an SD card slot) to allow for going back to replay video from the past. There is a mic but no speaker. No power over Ethernet but supports both wireless and Ethernet connectivity. Pretty good IR illumination. Wireless installation can interfere with garage door opener function if camera is used in garage. Changing the default HTTP port of 80 to something less obvious seemed to break local camera detection on the iOS app but the mydlink remote function keeps working.

The time/date schedule enabled functions: manual day/night mode, email/ftp, and motion detection don’t allow more than one time segment per day. To have a time segment span the midnight boundary requires kludging with the time-zone.

Firmware updates require first downloading the update file to your computer.

Cannot assign a camera to more than one mydlink account. Mydlink cloud does not provide a video record-to-cloud feature - you have to buy one of their NVRs or a SD slot camera. Trying to view video from the camera using the iOS Safari browser won’t work because iOS does not support JAVA – you have to use the app. iOS app seems to only support MJEPG.

Other Thoughts: I own 9 other consumer-grade network cameras from various vendors at this resolution and higher to use for comparison. The hardware on the D-Link compares well. It is about equal to a same-resolution Foscam in terms of external build quality and I think it is slightly better in terms of image quality. The pan/tilt is quiet. There is an IR cut filter. The hardware from the Google-purchased Dropcam company seems to be more expensive when you compare similar image resolutions. My personal experience with other cameras in this price range is that higher sensor resolutions don’t always translate into better images if the lens is poor -which it often is. The firmware does not limit you to having to using mydlink.

This camera’s resolution is just fine for checking on pet/child locations, seeing if your garage door is left open, or verifying that your sump pump is operating in a dark utility room via its night vision and audio. It is not sufficient for facial or license plate recognition applications.

The first question you have to answer when buying this kind of product is whether you are buying this as a monitoring gadget or as part of a security solution.

Security solutions are more than just buying cameras, figuring out secure installation, and calculating required camera bandwidths. Another major component is storing video for later playback. For network cameras this is usually done with a NVR - although in-camera storage or cloud storage can sometimes be used. D-Link makes several NVR’s that support between four to nine cameras each depending on model. Other D-Link cameras feature in-camera storage.

One security related compromise that is made to get mydlink to work without delving into setting up port-forwarding, firewall permissions, and DDNS is that the mydlink compatable devices must constantly broadcast to mydlink from within your network. It seems that initiating an outbound connection by the device is what makes all this work through a firewall. I don’t know if this can be turned off and I haven’t wiresharked this yet. The mydlink site then decides which account your camera is registered to in order to be able to connect from outside the network. So, you have to trust in D-Link corporation’s security and good intentions much like you trust Google when you have an android phone or gmail account.

READ FULL REVIEW
D-Link DCS-5009L Pan/Tilt Day/Night Motion Detection Wireless Cloud IP Camera
  • eggxpert iconEggXpert
  • Owned For: 1 day to 1 week

5 out of 5 eggs Good Sub-$100 IP cam 09/13/2014

This review is from: D-Link DCS-5009L Pan/Tilt Day/Night Motion Detection Wireless Cloud IP Camera

Pros: D-Link’s apparent goal with its entire product line is “Zero Configuration”. They try to make this camera easy to set up for the technologically challenged when it comes to networks, routers, port-forwarding, dynamic DNS, firewalls, and such - so that the video can be viewed remotely from outside your local network with no real setup effort.

Their solution is something called mydlink and the company’s eventual goal is to break into the smart home market with various modules that started with cameras and routers. The assumption is that a sub $100 camera with easy setup will trump something more technologically advanced with a more difficult setup. They are probably right. Explanation of security trade-offs are in “other thoughts”.

Three documented setup methods:
1) Own a D-link “Cloud enabled” router, hook up the camera to the network, log into your mydlink account and click “Yes” to add the camera.
2) Download “Setup Wizard” from the internet (Mac & Windows), follow instructions which may include installing Java if you don’t have it.
3) Do it all manually using the camera’s built in Web Configuration Utility– you may need to download the user manual from internet. The default IP if no DHCP is 192.168.0.20.

Android and iOS apps for viewing and controlling camera are available. The ipad iOS app that allows multiple cameras is not free. The one camera version iPhone/iPad app “mydlink Lite” is free. It has had some prior bad reviews but I liked the current version. It also allowed associating a wireless local camera that I manually set up to a mydlink account without having to download a Setup Wizard to the desktop. Support.dlink.com has some instructional videos, some sample video, and an emulation of the Web Configuration Utility.

I tested full manual set-up, e-mailing of snapshots and video clips to a gmail account on a time schedule, e-mail notification based on the motion detection 5 x 5 grid, uploads to an FTP server, remote access via port-forwarding, audio, and DDNS function. You can store up to 24 preset pan/tilt settings. Bonjour is supported as well as UPnP. H.264 bitrate can be specified. All the functions worked fine for me. Firmware is still on the 1.00 version.

Cons: The trend in network cameras is going to HD/megapixel resolution.

This is D-Link’s lower resolution camera but it is priced correctly for what you get. Limitations compared to a more expensive model: Max resolution is 640 x 480 (CMOS VGA) at 15 fps using either H.264 or MJPEG. Over the internet portal documentation states resolution is QVGA (320 x 240) but I seemed to get 480P on the free iOS app. Lens focus is manual. There is no optical zoom. Wireless n is single channel (150N). There is no in-camera storage (like an SD card slot) to allow for going back to replay video from the past. There is a mic but no speaker. No power over Ethernet but supports both wireless and Ethernet connectivity. Pretty good IR illumination. Wireless installation can interfere with garage door opener function if camera is used in garage too close to the opener antenna.

The time/date schedule enabled functions: manual day/night mode, email/ftp, and motion detection don’t allow more than one time segment per day. To have a time segment span the midnight boundary requires kludging with the time-zone.

Firmware updates require first downloading the file to your computer.

Cannot assign a camera to more than one mydlink account. Mydlink cloud does not provide a video record-to-cloud feature - you have to buy one of their NVRs or a different camera model with an SD slot. Trying to view video from the camera using the iOS Safari browser won’t work because iOS does not support JAVA – you have to use the app.

Other Thoughts: I own 9 other consumer-grade network cameras from various vendors at this resolution and higher for comparison. The hardware on the D-Link compares well. It is about equal to a similar-price same-resolution Foscam in terms of external build quality and seems to have a slightly sharper image in my opinion. The pan/tilt movement is quiet. There is an IR cut filter. The Google-purchased Dropcam products seem to be more expensive when you compare similar image resolutions. My personal experience with other cameras in this price range is that higher sensor resolutions don’t always translate into better images if the lens is poor -which it often is. The firmware does not limit you to having to using mydlink.

This camera’s resolution is just fine for checking on pet/child locations, seeing if your garage door is left open, or verifying that your sump pump is operating in a dark utility room via its night vision and audio. It is not sufficient for facial or license plate recognition applications.

The first question you have to answer when buying this kind of product is whether you are buying this as a monitoring gadget or as part of a security solution.

Security solutions are more than just buying cameras, figuring out secure installations, and calculating required camera bandwidths. Another major component is storing video for later playback. For network cameras this is usually done with a NVR - although in-camera storage or cloud storage can sometimes be used. D-Link makes several NVR’s that support between four to nine cameras each depending on model. Other D-Link cameras feature in-camera storage.

One security related compromise that is made to get mydlink to work easily without delving into setting up port-forwarding, firewall permissions, and DDNS is that the mydlink compatable devices must constantly broadcast to mydlink from within your network. It seems that the device initiating an outbound connection is what makes all this work. I don’t know if this can be turned off and I haven’t wiresharked this yet. The mydlink site then decides which account your camera is registered to in order to be able to connect back from outside the network. So, you have to trust in D-Link corporation’s security and good intentions much like you trust Google when you have an android phone or gmail account.

READ FULL REVIEW
Netgear 5-Port 10/100 Switch (FS205), 1-year Warranty, Plastic Case
  • eggxpert iconEggXpert
  • Owned For: 1 day to 1 week

Pros: Compact –> about the size of a pack of cigarettes. Cute Appearance –> think i-something. Energy efficient. Power adapter faces the right way so it only takes up one outlet slot. Auto-sensing ports. Good company. Good quality – see autopsy report in other thoughts.

If you are using a switch to share a consumer internet connection among less than 10 home computers this will be sufficient.

Cons: 10/100 speed.

10/100 (“fast ethernet”) uses 4 of the wires in a typical Ethernet cable and is fast enough for sharing a consumer internet connection and most normal consumer stuff.

1000 bits per second (“gigabit ethernet”) uses all 8 wires and is pretty prevalent these days particularly if you are intending to share large files between computers on the network. That assumes you have the other required infrastructure: the right cable (cat 6 suggested though 5E will work fine), a router supporting gigabit, gigabit Ethernet ports on your computers, and gigabit switches.

Other Thoughts: For some time now, unmanaged switches have been single-chip solutions offering wire-speed performance. I buy them primarily based on purchase price if I feel the brand is reputable. Price for 5 port consumer 10/100 switches at the time of this writing ranges from about 9 to 20 bucks while price for 5 port consumer gigabit switches ranges from about 15 to 40 dollars.

I disassembled this switch and found my model is based on a Realtek 8305 chip. This was a Rev 3 board. There was a piece of masking tape with handwritten QA test result notes in Chinese. The quality of the other components, the board layout, and the soldering quality looked good. No enclosure air vents were present or needed for this low-power switch.

I’ve always liked Netgear network products and the way they have supported open source routers.

READ FULL REVIEW

Gregory P.'s Profile

Display Name: Gregory P.

Date Joined: 11/07/09

Achievements:

  • Top 1000 Reviewer
  • Reviews: 70
  • Helpfulness: 45
  • First Review: 12/18/09
  • Last Review: 08/25/14
Shop by Region: United States | Canada | China
VeriSign Click for the BBB Business Review of this Computers - Supplies & Parts in Whittier CAThis site protected by Trustwave's Trusted Commerce program Inc500
Policy & Agreement | Privacy Policy  © 2000-2014 Newegg Inc.  All rights reserved.
If the Adobe Reader does not appear when you click on a link for a PDF file, you can download Adobe Reader from the Adobe web site. nassau