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Peter L.

Peter L.

Joined on 11/23/08

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  • 67
Most Favorable Review

ASUS ROG Poseidon GTX 780 - Excellent build quality, appearance, and built-in water cooling... for a premium

ASUS ROG POSEIDON-GTX780-P-3GD5 G-SYNC Support GeForce GTX 780 3GB 384-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 HDCP Ready Video Card
ASUS ROG POSEIDON-GTX780-P-3GD5 G-SYNC Support GeForce GTX 780 3GB 384-Bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 HDCP Ready Video Card

Pros: Very quiet and cool, even on air, at normal to mid-range loads. It has water cooling ability built in, which will cause temperatures and noise levels to drop greatly if used, especially at full loads, plus you don't have to spend money on an aftermarket water block or risk voiding your warranty. Extremely well-built, with a hefty back-plate to keep it rigid and help with component cooling. Easily outclasses my GTX 670 setup in the two benchmarks I tried (Unigine Valley and 3DMark Firestrike demo), scoring almost 50% higher in some areas. See Other Thoughts below for details and test results. Attractive appearance, with a slowly pulsating red ROG logo on the top edge. Green LEDs by auxiliary power sockets (8-pin and 6-pin) which turn red if your PCI-e cable is not plugged in correctly (a nice touch - the ASUS DirectCu II GTX 670 also has these). Streaming tool in the GPU Tweak software (I have not tried this yet). Came with free Watchdogs game coupon. Although my coupon had officially expired I was still able to redeem it and download the game. Stably powered in SLI by my 850W Seasonic PSU. Performed flawlessly in Kombustor stress testing and elsewhere, except for one glitch in one benchmark, which may be a driver issue (see next section).

Cons: There was a glitch when running the Unigine Valley benchmark, where occasional white flashes appeared on the screen - like lightning following the ground, as if it was trying, but failing, to paint a flat section of the landscape (not sure if this is a shader problem). Apparently other people have noticed this with 700 series cards, so perhaps it is a driver issue. Since it occurred with both of the Poseidons I tested, and they are unlikely to both be faulty, I hope this is the case. I never noticed it in the 3DMark tests, Kombustor, or any games. Price - All other GTX 780s cost less then the Poseidon (at time of writing), and some have faster clocks from the factory. Also, you could buy a GTX 780 Ti for less than $100 extra, although it might be of lesser build quality or cooling performance (even on air). You pay a premium for the Poseidon's extra features, and maybe the ROG branding.

Overall Review: It's quite a hefty, long card - check your case specs to see if it will fit, and make sure you screw it down securely at the case slot to avoid motherboard strain. Also be sure to plug in the auxiliary power connector to your motherboard if needed for running SLI. You'll definitely need it for more than 2-way. It's a shame the Poseidon doesn't come (as yet) in a Ti edition, but I think it was already in development before the 780 Ti was announced by nVidia. I was impressed by its performance compared to a fairly high end card from the previous generation (GTX 670, which performs close to a reference GTX 680 in some situations). Below are the results of the benchmark comparisons I mentioned earlier. [NOTE: I have 2 ASUS DirectCU II GTX 670s and tested them against 2 ASUS ROG Poseidon GTX 780s in both single and SLI mode. Resolution was set to 1920x1080, native for my monitor] In SLI, the Poseidon came in the top 3% of recorded scores for the 3DMark Firestrike demo. This was in a rig with an i5-3570K CPU, mildly overclocked to 4.2 GHz on a Gigabyte GA-77X-UD5H mobo, with 16GB of Mushkin Blackline 1600 RAM. The graphics cards were not overclocked, and the Poseidons were not water cooled (that will come later, as will a more powerful CPU/mobo combination). Firestrike demo scores: GTX 780 (1) 8224 - better than 83% of all results GTX 670 (1) 5850 - better than 57% of all results GTX 780 (SLI) 12532 - better than 97% of all results GTX 670 (SLI) 8617 - better than 83% of all results Unigine Valley scores (Extreme HD preset, 8xAA): GTX 780 (1) - 62.6 FPS, Score 2620 GTX 670 (1) - 42.6 FPS, Score 1782 GTX 780 (SLI) 102 FPS, Score 4266 GTX 670 (SLI) 77.3 FPS, Score 3233 Noise levels between the two models were roughly the same across all loads and. quiet up to mid-loads, with temperatures up to high 70's C in the stressful benchmark sections. Even at high loads, fan noise was not objectionable and there was no whining. CONCLUSION: In my opinion, this card only makes sense to buy if you intend to water cool it, otherwise you are wasting money on a feature that will never be used. On the other hand, assuming you have that intent, you get a factory installed, integrated water block (saving you a lot of hassle and possible warranty issues), and potentially the ability to overclock better than its lower priced competition. Plus, it will look very nice in an appropriately-themed build, especially in an ASUS ROG rig. Because of its build quality, features, and attractive design, and despite the one glitch I encountered -- which I attribute for now to a driver issue -- I believe the Poseidon is worthy of a 5-egg rating. Peter L. 06/05/14

Most Critical Review

Works well and looks good, but CUE software is incompatible with older version.

Corsair Gaming MM800C RGB POLARIS Cloth Edition Mouse Pad
Corsair Gaming MM800C RGB POLARIS Cloth Edition Mouse Pad

Pros: It looks good on your desk with the customizable RGB leds lining the edge. Mouse tracks well and the bottom is grippy so it doesn't slide around. Passthrough USB port lets you plug your mouse (or keyboard) in so there is no net loss of ports.

Cons: IMO there should be two USB ports so you can plug both mouse and keyboard in. My main complaint is that the CUE software needed to control the LEDs is incompatible with the previous version I was using with my Corsair gaming mouse. The macros I had written were unusable and since the interface has changed I will have to rewrite them all as well as learning to use the new GUI, which has changed substantially.

Overall Review: The extra USB port would have been nice, but the change in CUE interface and inability to use my old mouse macros really bothered me. If not for that, I would have awarded five eggs, and for anyone not using a Corsair mouse or keyboard with the old CUE, or doesn't mind reprogramming all their macros, then this is a nice product you can customize to match your rig's lighting. I prefer a static color, but the default (without CUE running) is a moving pattern of different colors.

Looks and works great, runs cool in my gaming PC

CORSAIR SF750 CP-9020186-NA 750 W SFX 80 PLUS PLATINUM Certified Full Modular Power Supply
CORSAIR SF750 CP-9020186-NA 750 W SFX 80 PLUS PLATINUM Certified Full Modular Power Supply

Pros: When I opened the box I couldn't believe how small this thing is, about half the size and weight of my current ATX PSU, yet still supplying more than adequate power with a Platinum rating. It installed like a charm in my Fractal Define R4 mid tower case after I attached the mounting plate. Note: This was only possible as it was replacing (for testing purposes) a Corsair RM850X, which has long enough (and more importantly, pin-out compatible) cables to reach the motherboard headers and peripherals in that case. The supplied cables are designed for a small form factor case and are short enough to route neatly in such a situation. They are also individually sleeved with no ugly capacitors, giving them a very nice appearance, though the sleeving is quite narrow, somewhat like CableMod aftermarket cables. On testing, it ran silently due to its passive (or Zero RPM) fan mode. My system includes a 4790K, a 980Ti, three hard drives, two SSDs, three fans, and several USB peripherals including a TV tuner. I would probably have to run SLI graphics cards to trigger the fan to turn on, but in a small form factor build this would not be an issue anyway. There was zero coil whine and the unit barely got warm, even after running benchmarks like Unigine Valley, and games such as Shadow of the Tomb Raider and Far Cry 5.

Cons: Not cheap, but considering its 80 Plus Platinum rating and 750 watts in such a small package, this is not unexpected. Minor gripe: I had to supply my own screws (6) to fit the mounting plate to the PSU, but in a SFF case you would probably attach the PSU directly to the chassis. There is no way to turn off passive fan mode, although in my testing it was never necessary.

Overall Review: The SF750 was supplied to me by Newegg for the purposes of this review. I can't think of any reason to deduct any eggs. It has run flawlessly since installation three days ago - if this changes I will revisit this review.

Runs fast and cool enough not to throttle.

WD Black NVMe M.2 2280 500GB PCI-Express 3.0 x4 3D NAND Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) WDS500G2X0C
WD Black NVMe M.2 2280 500GB PCI-Express 3.0 x4 3D NAND Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) WDS500G2X0C

Pros: Installed and tested without issue in both M.2 slots on my AM4 motherboard. Roughly four times faster sequential read/write speeds than a fast SATA SSD according to CrystalDiskMark. Temperatures were ok in my system in both M.2 slots, according to HWMonitor, reaching 62C max in the PCIe Gen2 x4 slot and 58C max in the PCIe Gen3 x4 slot (the latter gets some cooling from the CPU fan). No cable management needed, unlike regular SSDs. Just install and you're ready to go. It happens to match the black and white color scheme of my motherboard.

Cons: A lot more expensive than a regular SSD of the same storage capacity. While sequential read/write speeds are extremely fast, 4K speeds are not that much better than regular SSDs. In day to day use I can't really tell the difference between SATA SSDs and NVMe drives unless I am copying files from one NVMe drive to another (my boot drive is a 250GB Samsung 960 EVO). Copying to and from SATA drives will be limited to the SATA drive speed, of course.

Overall Review: Tested on Asrock Taichi X370 motherboard with Ryzen 7 1700 CPU (not o/c) and 64GB of G.Skill TridentZ RAM at 2933MHz. Windows 10 Pro. Here are the results I obtained with CrystalDiskMark on each M.2 slot PCIe Gen3 x4 read/write: Seq 2169/2394 512K 1496/2325 4K 46.55/140.2 4KQD32 311.4/202.1 PCIe Gen2 x4 read/write: Seq 1296/1369 512K 1058/1220 4K 39.74/90.86 4KQD32 178.4/132.1 I am awarding four eggs as I am not completely convinced of the value compared to regular SSDs. Others have given five eggs and I agree that it is worth that based only on performance. Note: Newegg provided me with the drive for the purposes of this review.

Runs great in three different motherboards I own (Intel and AMD).

G.SKILL TridentZ Series 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4 3000 (PC4 24000) Intel Z370 Platform Desktop Memory Model F4-3000C15D-32GTZ
G.SKILL TridentZ Series 32GB (2 x 16GB) DDR4 3000 (PC4 24000) Intel Z370 Platform Desktop Memory Model F4-3000C15D-32GTZ

Pros: I've had this RAM over a year, starting with 2x16GB sticks then adding two more a few weeks later for a total of 64GB. It runs fine at the rated 3000MHz in my ASUS Z170-A motherboard paired with an Intel 6700K. In my AM4 motherboards (Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming K7 and Asrock X370 Taichi) using a Ryzen R7 1700, it runs at 2933MHz using the XMP profile with no problems on all four sticks together.

Cons: The only Con for me at the moment is price, which has almost doubled since I bought it, like most RAM. I've since split it between two of my machines and have another brand in the third.

Overall Review: I wasn't too keen on the fixed red color of the plastic inserts, but that was all that was available at the time. It would be nice to have replacements available to purchase in different colors.

Great looking, compact case but with little space for cable management.

Corsair Crystal 460X RGB White CC-9011129-WW White Steel / Tempered Glass ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
Corsair Crystal 460X RGB White CC-9011129-WW White Steel / Tempered Glass ATX Mid Tower Computer Case

Pros: I just completed a build in this case, and I must say it looks very attractive with its tempered glass front and side panels, which show off the three front RGB fans behind a distinctively patterned dust filter, and my RGB motherboard. The 3-pin fans are not silent but pretty low noise, and there are sufficient color variations for my taste. I like the fact that it has a relatively small footprint compared to some of my other rigs. While light, it does not seem flimsy. There is plenty of ventilation from the three included RGB front fans, with space on the roof for three more, and a 120mm at the rear. Air flow is pretty good with ample clearance between the front tempered glass panel and the fans so the side vents can intake sufficient air. The magnetic filter (black) on the roof is a nice touch and is of good quality. Another nice touch is the holes in the case aligned with the PCI covers, which allow for easy screwdriver access. Three large cutouts by the motherboard allow for cable routing and have substantial grommets to protect cables against fraying. I was glad to see a well-placed cutout for the 8-pin CPU cable so it did not have to be routed across the motherboard. Buttons on the front panel for lighting modes, reset, and power have a satisfying feel and don't seem flimsy at all. The power supply shroud comes in two detachable parts, the front part also hiding the 2-bay hard drive cage. It has a hole in the middle, mainly intended for GPU power cables. You could route fan and front panel cables through it, but they would lie messily across the back half of the shroud. Since I have a white case, it would show these up clearly so I used the lowest side cutout in the motherboard tray. Behind the motherboard are three SSD bays in which you just slot your SSDs to be held in place by a spring and a latch. A small removable dust filter slides in under the PSU from the rear and is of adequate construction and quality.

Cons: Now for the not so good part: This case, while it has well-placed cable management holes and several tie-down points, has inadequate space between the motherboard tray and side panel. Using custom cable extensions, particularly a 24-pin, will be difficult, if not impossible, due to the difficulty of closing the panel. Just half an inch more would have roughly doubled the gap and made things so much easier. I've seen reviews of the 460X complaining about this, but did not appreciate it fully until my time to build. While the RGB fans are nice, I suspect most users will want to add a fourth at the rear to complete the look and also have an exhaust fan. This would add to the cost though, so I can see why it is not included. Of more concern to me is the fact that the fans depend on the Corsair controller and cannot be controlled by my RGB motherboard headers to sync with its LEDs. It has to be done manually with the front panel buttons or the internal controller buttons (included with the case). Each fan has two cables, one for RGB and one for power, so that adds to the cable management mess as they cannot be daisy-chained. They are also 3-pin and not PWM fans, and the bearings are not of the highest quality. While not noisy, time will tell how they hold up. The front panel only has two USB3.0 ports and no USB2.0 ports, likely due to the space used by the fans' RGB control buttons. There is no USB C header, though this is not an issue for most users yet.

Overall Review: Note: This case was provided to me by Newegg for review purposes. While I hate to mark down such a nice looking case, I am deducting a full egg for difficulty of building in it due to cable clearance behind the motherboard tray and the low number of front USB ports. If you want better fans, e.g. PWM and/or ones that work from motherboard RGB headers, you could get the cheaper model case and substitute them yourself, though that would raise the final cost above that of this case with its included fans and controller. Its other attributes, like build quality, air flow, and looks hold it at four eggs despite the other shortcomings. It really is an attractive, compact case that would look good on any desk.

seller reviews
  • 2

Satisfied customer

I recently purchased a Perfect Pixel Qnix 27" monitor from MNW Global. On inspecting it, I found a bad pixel in the lower left area of the screen. When I notified MNW of the problem they responded promptly, and after I sent photos of the screen, they offered to refund $50. As I did not want to have to deal with repackaging and returning the monitor, I accepted. The refund came through next day. I had previously bought a matte Qnix monitor from MNW (not the Perfect Pixel unit) and that one had zero defects. Delivery time on both was incredible - two days from Korea. Although I would have preferred a flawless monitor, I commend MNW on their attitude toward customer satisfaction and would do business with them again.

On-time
Delivery
Product
Accuracy
Customer Service
Satisfactory
11/21/2014

Amazingly quick delivery

Ordered a Qnix 27" monitor early Tuesday morning and it was shipped the same day from Korea, and on my doorstep in California by Thursday evening. The monitor had no defects whatsoever, and was well protected by foam in its original carton.

On-time
Delivery
Product
Accuracy
Customer Service
Satisfactory