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Michael C.

Michael C.

Joined on 06/10/10

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Product Reviews
product reviews
  • 7
Most Favorable Review

Excellent 27" value for the price

Acer G7 Series G277HL bid 27" Full HD 1920 x 1080 4ms 60Hz DVI HDMI VGA Slim Frame Design Flicker-Less Technology Widescreen Backlit LED IPS LCD Monitor
Acer G7 Series G277HL bid 27" Full HD 1920 x 1080 4ms 60Hz DVI HDMI VGA Slim Frame Design Flicker-Less Technology Widescreen Backlit LED IPS LCD Monitor

Pros: Bought two of the 27" IPS for $149 each. Already have a 24" Acer IPS. The monitors have excellent color saturation and brightness, as expected for IPS, matte finish. Stands are rock solid, other reviews say wobbly. There is a locking screw on the bottom of the X stand, you MUST tighten that into the vertical part of the stand. The connection of the vertical part to the monitor is not super solid but is firm, but I've not had any issues with monitor wiggling at all, and I am a hard typist. Do not confuse the IPS (G277) and non IPS version (G276) of this 27" model, unfortunately, the reviews on this page, seem to be a mix of different models. The non IPS has VESA mounting, but no DVI. The IPS version has DVI, but no VESA mounting. No speakers, but IMO speakers on monitor are a non-factor, they take up precious room inside that can be devoted to circuitry and power better applied to image and controls. I personally only buy IPS monitors the last 10 years or so. IMO, the display quality is just better; I'm not a gamer, so understand many gamers don't like IPS because it's possible that the dark and black areas the image being displayed are not 'dark enough'. Some gamers who play in a darkened room, find this objectionable. For non gaming, text and graphics work, the brightness and saturation of IPS are well worth it. IN prior years, there was a price premium for IPS, but these days, price difference between IPS and non IPS of similar models and sizes is minimal. The non IPS version of this monitor, on this particularly day, was $125 each I truly don't understand the complains about not having instruction included for screen controls, or that the buttons are marked. When you press a button, and ON SCREEN guide appears just above the button console, with each function on the guide above the corresponding button. And if that isn't clear enough, then simply count over the number of buttons with your finger based on the on screen guide. It is true that gamma or warmth adjustment is limited with these models, so if important to you to have detailed control over this, look elsewhere. For me, default values out of box are fine. People also "complain" about the power converter being external as part of the power cord, versus inside the monitor. Folks, the power converter HAS TO BE "somewhere", if it's internal, then it adds weight, and thickness to the monitor, and takes up space internally, space that could be used to hold additional electronics that support better display quality and controls. So think about it before complaining about the power converter being external. AGain, for $149, you would be hard pressed to find a better value for an IPS, 27" 1920x1080 monitor with HDMI, DVI and VGA connections.

Cons: If VESA mounting is important to you, note this model doesn't have it. Get the non IPS model G276

Most Critical Review

Last less than 2 years

Seagate Desktop HDD ST3000DM001 3TB 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive Bare Drive
Seagate Desktop HDD ST3000DM001 3TB 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive Bare Drive

Pros: Good products while they work, see cons

Cons: Have two of these drive, purchased together. Less than 2 years old. Both have started within the last month with the 'clicking noise of death', the precursor to failure. These were used were for very LIGHT duty, backup drives, using external docks, turned on once a day for daily backups and occasional access. On SMART test, you can see the bad sector and bad bytes indicators slowly creeping up, little by little.

Overall Review: I had issues with the 7200.11 product line (BSY error), and not really great experience so far with the 7200.14 line. 7200.12 was okay. I think I will go back to WD Blacks.

Inaccurate description of product, beware, read carefully

DELL Desktop Computer OptiPlex GX760 Core 2 Duo E8400 (3.00GHz) 4GB DDR2 320GB HDD Intel HD Graphics Windows 10 Home Multi-Language, English / Spanish
DELL Desktop Computer OptiPlex GX760 Core 2 Duo E8400 (3.00GHz) 4GB DDR2 320GB HDD Intel HD Graphics Windows 10 Home Multi-Language, English / Spanish

Pros: Decent product for $100 give or take.

Cons: Advertised as having a 7200RPM drive; actual drive delivered in system was Seagate 5900RPM, SATA II only drive, and one of those 'Power saving' models that spins down after period of no use. that severely bottlenecks performance. if you walk away and come back, have to wait for drive to spin back up. I replaced with an SSD, and a lot of people will anyways, but the point is you have to factor in additional cost. After adding in cost of SSD, the price/value ratio isn't as nice as might appear to be at first glance. Memory was listed at 4GB, but it was fulfilled as 2 x 1 GB chips, and one 2 GB chip, with the 3rd memory slot open, and 1,2 and 4 slots filled. This effects performance, as it is best to have matched pairs and even no of slots, and if nothing else, should have been 1,2 and 3 filled with 4 left open. Can't access memory slots without removing DVD drive, so left it alone for now. This is Small/Slim form factor case, accepts only low height add in cards. You've been warned if you intend to put in a PCI-E video card. Description fails to mention also has DisplayPort connector (full size), along with standard VGA. And external eSATA port, (but only SATA II , 3.0Gbps) I bought this PC to be a plex media server. Also , in hindsight, should have gotten machine with Win 10 Pro, not Home. Can not Remote DEsktop into Home version (duh, I knew that, not sure what I was thinking). For $100, not worth going through RMA, can find use for it and give to a grandchild or something. Definitely was not thinking clearly when I ordered, although the Windows thing is easy fix (install Pro, which amazingly, Microsoft still allows activation of Win 10 using legit Windows 7 or 8 product code). I can live with memory, so really the only big boo boo was not getting a 7200RPM drive as advertised.

Upgrade for a MacBookPro

Mushkin Enhanced Essentials 16GB (2 x 8GB) 204-Pin DDR3 SO-DIMM DDR3 1066 (PC3 8500) Laptop Memory Model 997019
Mushkin Enhanced Essentials 16GB (2 x 8GB) 204-Pin DDR3 SO-DIMM DDR3 1066 (PC3 8500) Laptop Memory Model 997019

Pros: Upgraded a MacBookPro 13" mid 2010 from factory 4GB to 16GB. No problems. Note that this model can support 16GB, although Apple says max is 8GB, provided you have latest EFI firmware and SMBIOS. Several Mac models can actually support more memory than Apple specs, but check first at either OWC or everymac dot com, for every model you can find out the actual max it can handle, if it is different from what Apple says it can support. At first Mac didn't recognize memory but that was my fault when I installed first time, I thought the chips were seated, but the two chips stack on top of each other and share the same release clip. when I pushed in the last (top) chips, i had loosened the one underneath. Reopened, and made sure both chips were pushed flat and down, then it was fine. Upgraded the HDD to a SSD at the same time, and you would never know it was 6 year old laptop, it FLYS! Upgraded OS X to El Capitan, and laptop feels as fast as new laptop, which tells you that you don't need the latest, fastest CPU for most things, just plenty of RAM and a good SSD. The price on this Mushkin was $52.99 for 16GB, only about $12 more than what other brands were charging for 8GB. SSD was about $50 on sale, so for about $100 have a laptop that is like new. Chips came packaged well, in firm plastic case in bubble wrap mailer. Wife is very happy, this is her laptop, she feels like she has a brand new machine!! For this laptop, if you upgrade to SSD, you don't need the top of the line, the laptop is SATA II, 3Gbs, not SATA III, 6Gbps, so one of the entry level TLC based SSD models is fine, what ever is on sale

Cons: None, was hesitate at first about buying memory that wasn't specifically for 'Apple' computers. You often hear that Apple computers are finicky about memory, and they are, the timing specs have to be spot on. As long as the memory is trusted brand and not 'grey' market chips, that meet the specs, it should work. By specs I mean not just the speed, but CAS and latency specs.

Not SATA III

[Support UASP and 16TB Drives] ORICO Tool Free USB 3.0 to SATA External Hard Drive Enclosure Case for 3.5inch  SATA HDD and SSD - Black (3588US3)
[Support UASP and 16TB Drives] ORICO Tool Free USB 3.0 to SATA External Hard Drive Enclosure Case for 3.5inch SATA HDD and SSD - Black (3588US3)

Pros: See my comment in Cons, does not support SATA III speeds.

Cons: Did some research, like the 2.5" product from ORICO sold on Newegg, the chipset maxes out at SATA II. Even though the spec says SATA III, that just means you can hook at SATA III drive to it, but the drive will fall back to SATA II. The folks saying they notice a speed increase, it is because of the change from USB 2 to USB 3, and that's fine, but it would be even faster if SATA III were supported. Looking on ORICO website, this product number and the one for the 2.5" product listed on NewEgg, have been replaced by newer models, likely with SATA III support, and probably we these products are being sold on NewEgg (discontinued / clearance).

Overall Review: Still very inexpensive for the price right now (under $20), so if the speed increase from USB 2 to USB 3 is worth it to you, great, but do not expect full SATA III throughput, i.e. the speed over USB 3 would be even faster.

Works just fine with Macs

Logitech 993-000439-01 Unifying USB Receiver for Mouse and Keyboard
Logitech 993-000439-01 Unifying USB Receiver for Mouse and Keyboard

Pros: In response to the one review saying the product did not work on their Mac Pro, I have used Logitech mice and keyboards with the unifying receiver for years, during that time, have used with dozens of Mac models; pro, laptops, iMacs, using OS X versions from Snow Leopard to Yosemite. have never had an issue, and devices are recognized by the Mac immediately, including during the boot process. Meaning I can use wireless keyboard and press keys to access boot options during startup. I'm not saying the person didn't have a problem, just wanted to offer another perspective. It should be noted that if you buy a replacement receiver, out of the box, you must first pair the new receiver with the mouse/keyboards you want, this is true of Windows and Mac. You pair it using a Logitech utility available on their website. Without pairing it first, the receiver does not know what mice or keyboards you want it to recognize, they are keyed to different frequencies and hardware IDs. And it can't assume that any and every mouse and keyboard within reception should be connected. I'm wondering if the individual who had a problem was aware of the need to run the pairing utility first. The utility is available for both Windows and Mac. You run the utility, it firsts scans the system for connected receivers, it then tells if that receiver is currently paired with any mice or keyboards and the models, you then have an option to REMOVE a device (remove the pairing) or ADD a device. To add, you are asked to toggle the power button on the device, then press a key on that device. It then registers the ID/frequency and saves it to the receiver (which obviously has some non volatile RAM memory inside used to save this info).

Cons: none