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Vu D.

Vu D.

Joined on 07/31/11

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Product Reviews
product reviews
  • 18
Most Favorable Review

Very pleased

ENCORE ENHWI-2AN3 Wireless Router With Repeater 802.11b/g/n up to 300Mbps/ 10/100 Mbps Ethernet Port x4
ENCORE ENHWI-2AN3 Wireless Router With Repeater 802.11b/g/n up to 300Mbps/ 10/100 Mbps Ethernet Port x4

Pros: - Compact size, pleasant looks as well - Decent coverage/signal strength - Cheap, cheap as hell - Includes necessary accessories - Great set-up guide on website (encore-usa.com/us/product/ENHWI-2AN3)

Cons: None, but I will edit if something pops up in the future.

Overall Review: I'm very surprised by the non-essential aspects of this product. The company seems to be very thoughtful and detail-oriented from what I can see (though they may not be very communicative from what we can read from the other reviews). Their included accessories prove sufficient, the set-up guide online is excellent (both exhaustive AND detailed, suitable even for technically challenged grandmas) and very easy to find. I'm not sure about the product itself due to my recent ownership, but I'll give a 10/10 rating for the item's support so far.

Surprisingly good for ~$20

CAD Audio U1 USB Recording Microphone With Tripod Stand Kit
CAD Audio U1 USB Recording Microphone With Tripod Stand Kit

Pros: I know next to nothing about audio, but this mic has been a pleasure to use. - Perfect plug-and-play compatibility with Windows (8.1 in my case) and ChromeOS. - includes a tri-pod stand - If I'm not mistaken, its recording region is shaped in a cardioid, i.e. only sound coming from the frontal cone is recorded. I have a fan blowing (relatively weakly) at it at a 45* angle and none of the sound is picked up.

Cons: - tripod is not adjustable - tripod's grip is not... stable - doesn't cook bacon

Overall Review: I bought it to record classical guitar with, and so far it's been offering much better sound than my previous guitar's built-in pick-up. From what I can tell, the sound very realistic (no exaggeration on faulty fingering, everything is as you would hear personally, sitting in the same position).

Brings unexpected joy every day

Rosewill Apollo - RK-9100xRBR - Mechanical Keyboard with Red Backlit
Rosewill Apollo - RK-9100xRBR - Mechanical Keyboard with Red Backlit

Pros: Well, it's a mechanical keyboard; it's a joy to use. I don't know a lot about mechanical keyboards, but these are the things I consider pros about this particular one: - The letters on the black keys are "just enough" transparent to let the LED through, giving the keyboard a very polished look. I swear I can stare at this thing all day. - Microphone/headphone connectors are convenient to have. USB ports too. - The palm rest justs just right. Not too sticky, not too slippery. - Clean branding. - This may have to do with the brown cherry switch, but I've found that it doesn't make that much noise when typing. - The clipper to remove the keys is easy to use as well.

Cons: - The keys on different rows have different heights, so I couldn't swap them around to learn Dvorak. - The palm rest is kind of difficult to insert/remove. I already broke one leg trying to remove it. It's still secured with 3 legs, but yeah.

Good old Newegg

ASUS Google Nexus 7 FHD (2013) Android Tablet -  2 GB RAM Quad-Core CPU 16 GB Flash (Wi-Fi Only)
ASUS Google Nexus 7 FHD (2013) Android Tablet - 2 GB RAM Quad-Core CPU 16 GB Flash (Wi-Fi Only)

Pros: At the risk of sounding like a broken record, here are the reasons you would want one of these babies: - High-res display 1920x1200. The Nexus 7 went from a mid-range display to top-of-the-line in the 7'' tablet circle. There's little point in having more than this many ppi, so I believe Google hit a sweet spot with this panel. It's an IPS display, so outdoors use is definitely not a problem. - Decent CPU/GPU. Frankly, I've never had ANY lag on my Nexus 4's Snapdragon S4 Pro, so I expect the same on the Nexus 7. The Tegra 3 was a state-of-the-art chipset last year, but Moore's Law is picking up steam around now (until we get to a point where the Snapdragon 800 is commonplace, then CPU upgrade probably won't result in any noticeable performance improvements). - Better portability with smaller widths (nearly 6cm decrease on the side bezels' widths) and also thickness by a tiny amount. Significantly lighter than the previous version in terms of percentage (from 340gram to 290gram). - Despite that thinness and weight drop, the tablet still retains more or less the same power supply from a 3950 mAh battery. While it's nothing significantly out of the usual leagues like the Samsung Galaxy Notes, the battery life from the old Nexus 7 has always lasted me at least 2 days on average use (though I don't do any gaming), so I'm not too worried there. If it's any added bonus, wireless charging with that Nexus 4 sphere. - Misc: + Stereo speakers. Unfortunately, they're back-facing speakers, unlike the Nexus 10 (or the HTC One if you're more familiar with that). They're not much to write home about, but having two is definitely better. + Dual-band Wi-Fi, though I myself don't have much experience with benchmarks for Wi-Fi throughput so I'm not sure how much of an advantage this is. + The rubbery-plastic back makes for better gripping with one hand. This together with the smaller width and the smaller weight make it extremely comfortable to hold. - It's a Nexus. This includes many pros: It's cheap as a rule; it's quickly updated (lots of the old Nexus 7s are getting their 4.3 update today, only 2 days after 4.3 was announced); it runs stock Android 4.3 (which is blazingly smooth from what I can tell so far on my Nexus 4); it gets a lot of love from the custom ROM community so your choices are varied; and it's rooted quickly (Chainfire has already had some working solution).

Cons: - The 32GB version is only $40 more. I wish I had been fast enough to get one of those. - No HDMI out but with Chromecast, this concern is trivial and even... a bit outdated. - No SD card / expandable storage, as usual. I've gotten used to living without it by now, but for some it might still be a bummer. - It's not Gorilla Glass 1 or 2 (Google advertises it as "Corning Glass"), so you might want to be careful. - No pressure-sensitive stylus support (I think). You can only use capacitative stylii.

Overall Review: If you shop on Newegg, you likely don't need me to ramble on about these things. Buy the darned thing already.

Odd

Rosewill RNX-N150UBEv3, Wireless N150 Wi-Fi Adapter, IEEE 802.11b/g/n, Up to 150 Mbps Wireless Data Rates, USB 2.0 Interface, 1 x 5 DBi Detachable High Gain Antennas, Win 10 Support
Rosewill RNX-N150UBEv3, Wireless N150 Wi-Fi Adapter, IEEE 802.11b/g/n, Up to 150 Mbps Wireless Data Rates, USB 2.0 Interface, 1 x 5 DBi Detachable High Gain Antennas, Win 10 Support

Pros: - Plug and go. Both Windows 8 and Ubuntu Precise loaded the driver in half a blink. - Superb signal (full bar at around 20 feet away, 2 layers of wall). - Decent throughput (I don't have a LAN network so I didn't bother checking). - Superbly cheap ($9 on promotion).

Cons: - Inconsistent on Ubuntu: It works flawlessly on my laptop running Windows, but on the Desktop that I need it for, the performance (when it actually is functional, which is rare) is abysmal. I'll have to find some way around this, or I may have to try something else. - Kind of fat, it somewhat occupies the horizontal space around it.

Greatest thing I can ever pay for

ENCORE ENHWI-3GN3 3G Mobile Broadband Wireless N150 Router plus Repeater IEEE 802.3/3u, IEEE 802.11b/g, IEEE802.11n Draft 2 Up to 150Mbps
ENCORE ENHWI-3GN3 3G Mobile Broadband Wireless N150 Router plus Repeater IEEE 802.3/3u, IEEE 802.11b/g, IEEE802.11n Draft 2 Up to 150Mbps

Pros: - Low price. I got one for $20 on sale. - Small form factor. It's about as large as a 3.5'' HDD. - Nice signal strength + coverage. - Love the guides on the Encore USA website.

Cons: None that qualifies as a con. Maybe durability, but we will see.

Overall Review: There are a few nuances with setting this baby up as a Repeater. If you're lucky, you'll manage to set up the second network exactly identical to your home network, and it will work. The guide on their website is excellent even for the very tech-illiterate people (supposing you know some basic terms like 'browser', 'SSID', 'WEP' and have a grasp of your own home network, basically just 3 things that you need to log into that network: name, security type and security key/pass). The only advice I can give in case you've followed the instruction to the letter yet your computer still connects to the old network is to re-set both of them and this time, pay attention so that you can guarantee the two networks are identical.