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5 out of 5 eggs The warranty on the ST8000NM0055 is 5 years Parts & Labor + Data Rescue. 06/28/2016

This review is from: Seagate 8TB Enterprise Desktop Hard Disk Drive - 7200 RPM SATA 6.0Gb/s 256MB 3.5" ST8000NM0055

Pros: Seagate says that here: www.seagate.com/internal-hard-drives/enterprise-hard-drives/hdd/enterprise-capacity-3-5-hdd/

Seagate manufactures many different types of drives. Some transfer data faster than other. Some are made with higher quality components. Some are designed to have more data written to them every year than others. Their warranties differ according to these and other variables. Some of their drives come with 5 year parts and labor warranties that also includes Data Rescue. Some drives have only 3 years part and labor have Data Rescue as an option and aren't designed to have nearly as much data written to them on an annual basis. Their basic drives only come with a 1 year parts and labor warranty.

They publish their warranties clearly. This 8TB, 7200rpm drive is spec'd for more than 500TB of of data being written each year has a street price of $400. Contrast that with Seagate's 8TB external drive for home use that has a street price of a little more than $200. It is a 5400rpm drive that connects via USB and is not designed for heavy writing.

NAS drives from Seagate are designed for a lot of reads and writes. They have NAS hard drive offerings with warranties for 1 year P&L to as much as 5 years P&L. The more expensive ones generally speaking have faster transfer speeds, are designed to write more data and use better parts. They cost more and they have better warranties.

When I look at reviews of this series of hard drives ST8000xx00yy, I see 85%-90% of the people give them 5 stars and only 10%-15% of people give 1 or 2 stars. That's about as good as it gets for hard drives even for SSDs. Cheaper hard drives typically have 20%-30% of people giving them 1 or 2 stars, nearly always for DOA drives or drives that died sooner after purchase than the buyer thought reasonable.

So far I've been very lucky: I have 7 of theT8000NM0055 drives. 4 have been running 7x24 since 12/2015. The other 3 have had heavy use but not 7x24. I have not had any issues with any of the drives. I am happy enough to buy 3 more.

Do I expect every drive to last 5 years without failing? No. That's why I run them in RAID arrays and backup often. Hard drives fail. That's the way it is.

I choose hard drives with a clear understanding of their warranty, the reliability or more accurately the initial reliability based on the ratings from places like NewEgg and the performance I need for a specific application. I know what I am buying up front. If a drive fails I get one expletive deleted and then go to backup.

That is different from what I do when I can't resist a bargain drive and then it fails. When that happens I go after myself, do far more expletives deleted and swear never to do that again. But I still have my backup!

Cons: Like all 7200rpm drives, it ran hot in a poorly ventilated case like QNAP's TS-151x and TS-131x dual drive RAID enclosures. What's hot? 50-51C. That's still within their 55C max temp limit but I don't like it when drives get too hot to touch.

The first thing I did was drill holes in the solid face of the QNAP Carriers. That dropped the temp down to 45-46C. Then I looked at the QNAP 70mm case fan and replaced it with a $35 Noctua fan. It brought the temp down to 38-40C and I never hear the fan any more either. Spending $35 to better protect $800 worth of drives seems perfectly reasonable to me. And my gripe is with QNAP not Seagate. Hard drives need good ventilation. It's that simple.

Other Thoughts: I would absolutely and without reservation recommend this drive and its series which shares the same mechanism: ST8000xx00yy.

The letters denote the interface, whether the drive is encrypted or not and how easy it is to delete the data on the drive. There is some variation in price according to the specific features.

--SFOalan

READ FULL REVIEW

5 out of 5 eggs The ST8000NM0055 has a 5 year P&L warranty with data recovery. 06/28/2016

This review is from: Seagate Constellation ES.3 ST4000NM0033 4TB 7200 RPM 128MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Enterprise Internal Hard Drive Bare Drive

Pros: Seagate says that here: www.seagate.com/internal-hard-drives/enterprise-hard-drives/hdd/enterprise-capacity-3-5-hdd/

Seagate manufactures many different types of drives. Some transfer data faster than other. Some are made with higher quality components. Some are designed to have more data written to them every year than others. Their warranties differ according to these and other variables. Some of their drives come with 5 year parts and labor warranties that also includes Data Rescue. Some drives have only 3 years part and labor have Data Rescue as an option and aren't designed to have nearly as much data written to them on an annual basis. Their basic drives only come with a 1 year parts and labor warranty.

They publish their warranties clearly. This 8TB, 7200rpm drive is spec'd for more than 500TB of of data being written each year has a street price of $400. Contrast that with Seagate's 8TB external drive for home use that has a street price of a little more than $200. It is a 5400rpm drive that connects via USB and is not designed for heavy writing.

NAS drives from Seagate are designed for a lot of reads and writes. They have NAS hard drive offerings with warranties for 1 year P&L to as much as 5 years P&L. The more expensive ones generally speaking have faster transfer speeds, are designed to write more data and use better parts. They cost more and they have better warranties.

When I look at reviews of this series of hard drives ST8000xx00yy, I see 85%-90% of the people give them 5 stars and only 10%-15% of people give 1 or 2 stars. That's about as good as it gets for hard drives even for SSDs. Cheaper hard drives typically have 20%-30% of people giving them 1 or 2 stars, nearly always for DOA drives or drives that died sooner after purchase than the buyer thought reasonable.

So far I've been lucky: I have 7 of theT8000NM0055 drives. 4 have been running 7x24 since 12/2015. The other 3 have had heavy use but not 7x24. I have not had any issues with any of the drives. I am happy enough to buy 3 more.

Do I expect every drive to last 5 years without failing? No. That's why I run them in RAID arrays and backup often. Hard drives fail. That's the way it is.

I choose hard drives with a clear understanding of their warranty, the reliability or more accurately the initial reliability based on the ratings from places like NewEgg and the performance I need for a specific application. I know what I am buying up front. If a drive fails I get one explitive deleted and then go to backup.

That very different from what I do when I can't resist a bargin drive and then it fails. When that happens I go after myself, do far more expletive deleted and swear never to do that again. But I still have my backup so the self recrimination doesn't go on too long.

Cons: Like all 7200rpm drives, it ran hot in a poorly ventilated case like QNAP's TS-151x and TS-131x dual drive RAID enclosures. What's hot? 50-51C. That's still within their 55C max temp limit but I don't like it when drives get too hot to touch.

The first thing I did was drill holes in the solid face of the QNAP Carriers. That dropped the temp down to 45-46C. Then I looked at the QNAP 70mm case fan, shock my head and replaced it with a $35 Noctua fan. It brought the temp down to 38-40C and I never hear the fan any more either. Spending $35 to better protect $800 worth of drives seems perfectly reasonable to me.

Other Thoughts: I would absolutely and without reservation recommend this drive and its series which shares the same mechanism: ST8000xx00yy.

The letters denote the interface, whether the drive is encrypted or not and how easy it is to delete the data on the drive. There is some variation in price according to the specific features.

-- SFOalan

READ FULL REVIEW

5 out of 5 eggs Re: the 4TB drive working in Vista but not XP 05/16/2016

This review is from: Seagate 4TB Expansion Portable External Hard Drive USB 3.0 Model STEA4000400 Black

Pros: I suggest you try partitioning the drive as 2 2TB drives. XP can't deal with partitions larger than 2TB. Sometime manufactures include software with the drive that solve this issue but since you said it worked in Vista, my guess is that either you aren't using that software or none was included. Vista can work with larger partitions depending on the version of the Vista and how the drive was initially formatted. You can also call, email or chat with Seagate Tech Support.

Cons: see Pros

Other Thoughts: See Pros.

READ FULL REVIEW

Alan H.'s Profile

Display Name: Alan H.

Date Joined: 04/06/05

  • Reviews: 25
  • Helpfulness: 14
  • First Review: 12/08/09
  • Last Review: 06/28/16
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