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CORSAIR Flash Voyager 128GB Slider X1 USB Flash Drive Model CMFSL3X1-128GB
  • eggxpert iconEggXpert
  • Owned For: 1 week to 1 month

5 out of 5 eggs Great Capacity/Good Speed for the Price 06/01/2015

This review is from: CORSAIR Flash Voyager 128GB Slider X1 USB Flash Drive Model CMFSL3X1-128GB

Pros: - Compact design which shouldn't have trouble reaching most ports.
- Slide cover to protect the USB port which features rubberized black plastic finish and ergonomic grip grooves along the sides. It feels nice and functions well.
- Key ring hole.
- Very large amount of storage in a fairly small device. This is nearing dedicated HDD capacity and would work nicely for loading a portable OS.
- USB 3.0 allows for higher file transfer speeds.

Cons: - The drive performs similarly to its 64GB sibling in not making great use of USB 3.0. Writing several large and small files to the drive resulted in an average transfer rate of around 18MB/s with a maximum of around 22MB/s. Reading from the drive wasn't quite as bad but still never reported speeds faster than 78MB/s. Average reads were closer to 70MB/s.

Other Thoughts: I recently reviewed Corsair's 64GB version of this drive. They are essentially identical besides the storage capacity.

Personally, I want more speed out of a USB 3.0 flash module, but the price isn't bad here. You get reasonable speed, great capacity, in addition to compact durability. It's a good deal if you don't require the speed. If speed is what you need then fork over some more bones.

The drive is preformatted using FAT32 which does not support files larger than 4GB. Unless the drive will be used on system which does not support other file systems I generally suggest formatting to NTFS or exFAT.

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CORSAIR Flash Voyager 64GB Slider X1 USB Flash Drive Model CMFSL3X1-64GB
  • eggxpert iconEggXpert
  • Owned For: 1 week to 1 month

5 out of 5 eggs Fast Enough For The Price 05/07/2015

This review is from: CORSAIR Flash Voyager 64GB Slider X1 USB Flash Drive Model CMFSL3X1-64GB

Pros: - Compact design which shouldn't have trouble reaching most ports.
- Slide cover to protect the USB port which features rubberized black plastic finish and ergonomic grip grooves along the sides. It feels nice and functions well.
- Key ring hole.
- High enough storage capacity for most data needs.
- USB 3.0 allows for higher file transfer speeds.

Cons: - The drive doesn't make great use of USB 3.0. Writing several large and small files to the drive resulted in an average transfer rate of around 17MB/s with a maximum of around 19MB/s. Reading from the drive wasn't quite as bad but still never reported speeds faster than 73MB/s. Average reads were closer to 65MB/s.

Other Thoughts: Personally, I want more speed out of a USB 3.0 flash module, but the price isn't bad here. You get somewhat decent speed, great capacity, in addition to compact durability. It's a good deal if you don't require the speed.

The drive is preformatted using FAT32 which does not support files larger than 4GB. Unless the drive will be used on an unsupported system I generally suggest formatting to NTFS or exFAT.

I noticed another reviewer questioning the 58GB reported capacity. This is normal and is the result of how computers calculate storage capacity vs the way storage capacity is sold. The drive certainly has around 64,000,000,000 bytes available. However, a kilobyte is not 1000 bytes, it is 1024 bytes. Similarly, a megabyte is 1024 kilobytes, not 1000. And so on... The number to remember is 1024, not 1000. So, if you do the math you'll find that 64,000,000,000 bytes comes out to 59.6GB. All drive capacities are calculated this way.

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TP-LINK TL-WDR4300 Dual Band Wireless N750 Router, Gigabit, 2.4GHz 300Mbps+5GHz 450Mbps, 2 USB port, IP QoS, Wireless On/Off Switch
  • eggxpert iconEggXpert
  • Owned For: 1 week to 1 month

Pros: - While not a totally objective point, the appearance should work well for most people. It is plain black with all green LED's (NOT blue as is shown in the product tour above) which are reasonably sized and not overly bright. The LED indicators are also shaped so you should be able to see what is being indicated from across the room. The device has a low profile from the front so it shouldn't look overbearing amidst other electronics.

- An On/Off button is something I consider to be a premium feature for routers, so it's nice to see one included on this more affordable model.

- Wireless On/Off is uncommon even in premium routers so its inclusion here really makes this router stand out in its price class.

- 3 large, adjustable, detachable antennas allows for a reasonable degree of flexibility.

- Mounting 'key holes' on the bottom of the unit allow for wall/ceiling mounting.

- WPS button for easy configuration, also not typically found in budget routers.

- Wireless Signal strength isn't horrible. While obviously not as fast as some of the pricey wireless AC models I have used, it seems to be on par with mid-range wireless N offerings. It is decent balance of speed and range. Play around with the channel settings if range becomes an issue.

- After a week of heavy testing I have not been required to reset this model. Throughout the week it has been constantly connected via WiFi to a PC, laptop, tablet, 2 smart phones, a Wii, and 2 smart TV's, and has been connected via ethernet to a NAS (with dual ethernet), a home theater PC, and a PS3. All devices were used normally with no issues.

- TP Link customer service seems to be amazing, which is rare with network hardware companies. Just reviewing their comments on reviews of this product alone reveals that they not only read and respond to customer concerns, but are actually very knowledgeable with their products. (not your typical, "maam/sir have you tried restarting your device..?")

Cons: - Large desk-space footprint. At nearly 10 inches wide and 8 inches deep (including the antennas) it consumes as much space as many of the premium wireless AC routers.

- No vertical stand options.

- Most of the ventilation is on the bottom of this unit. There are small vents on the top, but the design might benefit from some on the sides as well. I see people put their router on a carpeted floor regularly (don't do this) and this model might not ventilate well enough in that scenario.

- While signal strength is adequate for the price, it may not be enough for some users. My home is single story 1400 sq ft with 3 bedrooms and an attached garage and sits on a 3/4 acre lot. I positioned the router in the center of the house for a week of testing. Some of the more powerful dual band routers I have tested have allowed me to connect on either band throughout the house in addition to the front/back porch, garage, and large portions of the yard. With this router, however, I was not able to connect from the garage or the yard at all, and the front/back porches were both unreliable. Indoor connections were all reliable but speed was effected significantly at a distance. My home has a very open floor plan so I was expecting a bit more performance here but it wasn't unacceptable for the price. Just be weary of the limitations if you have a multi-story, >3 bedroom home, or wish to connect reliably from outside. If that is you then you may want to spend more for a router with more powerful radios.

Other Thoughts: The router that was shipped to me is a version 1.7 and based on many of the reviews below it seems that TP-Link has made some improvements to the design over the past year or so. I had no issues that I wouldn't have expected given the price. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend this router to someone living in an apartment or small to medium home. If you live in a large home and/or require throughput closer to the Gbps range you should give this one a pass and consider a premium wireless AC model.

I read complaints about the setup disk below. And even though I didn't experience those issues I don't generally use setup disks when setting up a router anyway. From my experience they can be hit or miss so I generally avoid them altogether. So, here is a brief tutorial for anyone having trouble with the disk...

I simply supply the router with power, wait a couple minutes for it to boot up, and connect a PC to it via Ethernet to configure it. Most routers, including this one, use the local address 192.168.0.1. Simply type that into your web browser address bar and it should connect you to the router to configure it. This model can also be reached via the web address: tplinklogin.net , which can be reached without internet access since the web page is hard coded into the router itself. This URL and the login username and password are printed on the bottom of the router, as with almost all routers. Once logged on you can configure wireless settings (passwords, etc..). Even if the location you intend to place the router isn't near a computer you can always temporarily plug the router in next to your PC just to configure it and then move it wherever you want afterwards without losing your settings. As soon as you configure your settings (and you don't technically have to configure anything if you don't intend to have a secure network) you can simply plug in your modem and any devices you connect to the router should connect without issues.

Another common issue less experienced network users tend to encounter when upgrading a router involves the router MAC address. Modems will register to whatever device they are plugged into when they are activated (generally a router or PC). So if you plug something different into that modem (ie. upgrade your router) it won't work unless you re-register the modem to the new device. Re-registering the modem isn't too difficult if you have the CD which came with it, but many people throw them away or can't remember which junk drawer in the kitchen it's buried in. There is an easier way to get around this called MAC address cloning which is something this router (and almsot all routers) can do. On this model the option is located under Network > MAC Clone. Simply type the MAC address of the previous device into the 'WAN MAC Address' field and click 'Save'. (The MAC address is usually labeled on the bottom of the router) This will make the modem think it is plugged into the same device it was registere

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Matthew H.'s Profile

Display Name: Matthew H.

Date Joined: 04/13/05

  • Reviews: 54
  • Helpfulness: 28
  • First Review: 06/21/05
  • Last Review: 06/01/15
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