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Corsair Gaming K70 LUX Mechanical Keyboard Backlit Red LED Cherry MX Brown (CH-9101022-NA)
  • eggxpert iconEggXpert

Pros: + Not Brown - I was initially confused with "Brown" being in the name. It's a reference to the type of switches used for the keys and fortunately (unless you're into brown PC peripherals) has nothing to do with the color of the lights (they are red) or the keyboard itself. The keyboard is a beautiful not-brown black with great looking not-brown red lights.

+ Volume Knob - I had been using a Corsair Strafe for the past month or so and loved it. But the biggest thing I was really missing with that keyboard was some sort of dedicated volume control. This keyboard has it in the form of a wonderful volume knob and a dedicated mute button.

+ Brushed Anodized Aluminum Faceplate - They call it "aircraft grade" on the box which seems kinda silly to me (My career is to work on aircraft and the properties that are important for aircraft materials aren't particularly important for keyboards), but I like the end product. Only the face is aluminum, and I suspect that it is purely for aesthetics, but for me it really takes the keyboard a step beyond the all-plastic look of the Strafe. This also seems to make it easier to clean the board as the "Cherry MX Brown" switches basically sit on top of the aluminum face, allowing the user to clean under the keys without removing them.

+ Wrist Rest - I've never been a fan of wrist rests for a keyboard, but I ran into a new problem with using the Corsair Strafe... Basically since the keys are raised completely above the keyboard faceplate I'm more prone to accidentally pressing the keys on the front row (menu, windows keys, spacebar, etc...). The wrist-rest on this model seems to solve that problem for me. I noticed that the Strafe has sockets present for a wrist-rest to be used but it does not ship with one like this K70 does. I also particularly like the texture of this piece, it has a smooth perforated rubber finish.

+ Braided Cable - This is yet another one-up on the Corsair Strafe that I used before. It's the same big double cable, except for this K70 it's got a braided cover which adds a little class and extra durability.

+ Elevated keys - Most mechanical keyboards will have the keys deeply recessed in the keyboard's frame. This tends to make them dust/Dorito magnets that are difficult to clean without removing all of the keys. The keys on this board are elevated above the board which makes it much easier to get bits of stuff out from under them without having to perform surgery. This also further exposes the brushed aluminum faceplate that looks particularly nice.

+ Pleasant key texture - The spacebar is textured like an industrial grip floor and the custom gaming keys are textured to match. The feel is nice and makes it easier to find my hand position in shooters.

+ USB Port - And not just any USB port, but a USB port with its own dedicated USB cable and plug. You'll have no concerns with bandwidth or latency issues due to multiple devices sharing a port with the keyboard. This is simply a pass-through port that supports USB 3.0 functionality. I measure a very consistent 40MB/s transfer rate through this port with a Sandisk Extreme USB 3.0 thumb drive.

+ Easy installation with Corsair Utility Engine - I unplugged my Corsair Strafe, and plugged in this K70 LUX. Moments after plugging it in I received a message stating that the K70 that I had just plugged in required a firmware update. I agreed to the update and just a minute or so later the update was complete and the software recognized the keyboard perfectly. Granted I already had the Utility software installed, but it only would have been one more step (installing the software) if it hadn't been.

+ Really cool lighting effects - I've had illuminated keyboards for years so lighting itself is nothing new to me. So when I got this keyboard I wasn't expecting to be impressed by the lighting. But I've been surprised by some of the cool, albeit unnecessary, lighting features. Who needs a keyboard that can do a good Night Rider visor impression? Or a keyboard that lights up individual keys as you type them? Or creates a light-pond ripple effect as you press keys? Or lights up in a Matrix-style rain pattern? Nobody, probably. But it's really fun to play around with and show off! The lighting is also VERY intense and should be bright enough for anyone as it has 3 different brightness levels in addition to off. You'll need to install the Corsair software to enable all of the features.

+ Adjustable Front Feet - This isn't something that I'm particularly interested in but it's the first keyboard that I've seen that has this option. Any extra option is welcome in my book.

Cons: - Dim/Reversed secondary key symbols - The special character symbols are all significantly more dim than the primary characters and are also reversed in their position compared with most other keyboards. For example, "!, @, #, $, %, ^, etc" are all typically located above the number symbols that they are associated with. On this keyboard they are below. It's not a big deal to me but a couple of the keys, particularly =/+ (basically any that I have to look for visually), are a little more confusing.

- Clickity-Clack - I don't mind it at all but my SO has complained that the keyboard is "loud". The spacebar in particular makes a lot of noise.

- Non-Unified Corsair Software - I have a Corsair wireless headset, H80iv2 CPU water cooler, MX780 mouse, and now this keyboard. I have no less than 3 separate pieces of Corsair software running in my taskbar to interface with each of these devices (2 of which use the same icon!). I have no issues with the individual pieces of software, but it would be nice if they would consolidate them more (the mouse and keyboard use the same one, fortunately).

- Key removal tool storage - Every now and then there is a product that includes a level of detail where any small tool used specifically for that device will be stored on the device itself somewhere. This is not one of those products. I will likely lose this little key grabber thing in a matter of days (if my cat doesn't get to it first).

- Massive tree-trunk cable - The USB cable for the keyboard has the girth of a construction site heavy duty extension cord. Granted it will probably outlive every other computer component I'll ever own, and it is technically TWO cables in one, but my keyboard tray gets into fights with it. It's not a very big 'Con' for me (honestly, I kinda prefer it like it is), but I figure it's worth mentioning for anyone that might get annoyed by it.

Other Thoughts: As I mentioned earlier, I've used the Corsair Strafe for the past month or so. That keyboard had found itself at home on my desk and I had little intention of replacing it in the foreseeable future. But in spite of everything that I liked about it I wished that it had dedicated volume controls. This K70 LUX not only rectifies that specific issue, but improves upon a number of other elements that I didn't even think were lacking to begin with. To me, this is nearly a perfect keyboard. I honestly almost ran out of room typing out all of the "Pros" for this thing. It got kinda tiring...but at least they keyboard I typed this on is pretty amazing!

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Intel Core i7-6800K 15M Broadwell-E 6-Core 3.4 GHz LGA 2011-v3 140W BX80671I76800K Desktop Processor
  • Verified Owner
  • neweggOwned For: 1 week to 1 month

5 out of 5 eggs Very Pleased With The Only Reasonably Priced Broadwell-E 08/11/2016

This review is from: Intel Core i7-6800K 15M Broadwell-E 6-Core 3.4 GHz LGA 2011-v3 140W BX80671I76800K Desktop Processor

Pros: + Fantastic Performance - This is my first Intel system in ages, and while I haven't had any major gripes with my AMD systems, this CPU performs significantly better at stock settings than my overclocked AMD 8 core. My AMD system would show signs of struggle when performing relatively simple tasks such as opening lots of browser tabs - that is not the case with this chip. I haven't noticed any real world performance benefits in games, but if I output detailed performance metrics while gaming it is clear that this CPU is not taxed nearly as much as my old CPU - it clearly has LOTS of headroom.

+ Significantly lower power consumption at load - I upgraded from an AMD FX8350 based system which was fairly power hungry. At load my entire system would draw ~600 watts. For my new build I only replaced the CPU, motherboard, and RAM. Everything else is identical. So it's a good scenario to compare CPU power consumption. With my new build I measure almost exactly 500 watts. So, I'm not only getting much better performance but using significantly less power in the process. You can really see the 14nm process technology at work with this level of efficiency.

+ Stays cool w/ Corsair H80iv2 - Using this relatively small closed loop water cooler I wasn't totally confident that this CPU would stay as cool as I would like. It does great! In fact, I was able to dial down the fan and pump speeds well below their baseline 'Quiet' settings. The custom profile I created keeps the fan RPM at its minimum setting until the CPU reaches 35C, at which point it climbs gradually and reaches 50% at 50C. From there I have it set to climb to a theoretical 100% at 85C. While gaming I rarely see the CPU reach above 50C. Running Prime95 for an hour straight resulted in a peak temp of 63C.

+ The only reasonably priced Broadwell-E - I suppose if you're extremely wealthy then "reasonably priced" gains new meaning. But for regular middle-class folks like myself $600+ for JUST a CPU isn't really viable. This chip certainly isn't cheap, but it is in the same family as the current best desktop CPU's in the world - mainly just sacrificing PCIE lanes - while carrying a price-tag roughly 1/4th that of the most expensive Broadwell-E. Unless you require 20 threads or 40 PCIE lanes then there's currently no reason to spend more than this.

+ Upgradable - Not only is this a very high end component, but it sits in a 2011v3 socket which is just waiting for a 10 core 6950X. I like to think that in 3-5 years if this system is showing its age I might be able to pick up an "old" used 6950X for cheap and extend the life of this rig.

Cons: - Was expecting lower idle power - As I mentioned before my previous AMD FX8350 based system was fairly power hungry. At idle my entire system would draw ~370 watts, and at load ~600. As I pointed out, the my load power draw has improved substantially, but since the PC sits idle for the vast majority of the time I was really hoping for lower idle power consumption. Unfortunately, at idle I only draw ~10 watts less with this CPU, and that might have more to do with the fact that DDR4 uses less power than DDR3.

- PCIE Lane Limitation - I'm not a fan of Intel's decision to limit the number of PCIE lanes available through the CPU. My motherboard has 4 full length PCIE slots and this CPU's limitations results in my lowest slot being disabled. Currently I'm using 1 slot for graphics, 1 for a RAID controller, and 1 for sound. Granted that's enough for now, but if I ever decide to add a second graphics card I'll have to decide which add-on card I'll be voting off the island. I'm not sure of the engineering reasoning behind this design limitation, but it feels like intel strong-arming their customers into buying fancier CPU's to enable the rest of their hardware. When I buy a motherboard I believe that all of its features should be enabled regardless of which CPU I decide to pair it with. It feels like buying a car where some of the trunk space is off-limits unless you upgrade the engine.

Other Thoughts: I've used AMD CPU's almost exclusively since the late 90's. Originally their CPU's were simply less expensive while offering essentially identical performance. Then, in the early 2000's, they took the performance crown and maintained it for years while simultaneously maintaining competitive pricing. But ever since Intel took the crown with Core2 and AMD messed up with Phenom it's been an uphill battle for them. My last few AMD chips have been partially bought out of a sense of loyalty, but mainly due to their value.

I honestly wouldn't have bought this CPU but I got both a 2011v3 socket motherboard and 16GB of DDR4 RAM for free. Being halfway to a new build I decided to bite the bullet and build my first high-end Intel build in over a decade, and I don't regret it. I still believe that Intel upper-end CPU's are generally too expensive, and I wish that AMD would release more competitive hardware again to bring balance to the CPU market... but this CPU is pretty awesome. I love the performance and I love the stability. So as much as I kinda dislike saying it I'm fairly pleased with this Intel CPU. I'm really anticipating AMD's Zen architecture within the next few months, and I hope that somehow it blows the socks off of Intel, but for now I take no issue enjoying this fine piece of hardware and will probably use it for years.

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Corsair Gaming STRAFE MX Silent Mechanical Keyboard, Backlit Red LED, Cherry MX Silent
  • eggxpert iconEggXpert

5 out of 5 eggs Not What I Would Call "Silent", But I Still Love It 08/04/2016

This review is from: Corsair Gaming STRAFE MX Silent Mechanical Keyboard, Backlit Red LED, Cherry MX Silent

Pros: + Really cool lighting effects - I've had illuminated keyboards for years so lighting itself is nothing new to me. So when I got this keyboard I wasn't expecting to be impressed by the lighting. But I've been surprised by some of the cool, albeit unnecessary, lighting features. Who needs a keyboard that can do a good Night Rider visor impression? Or a keyboard that lights up individual keys as you type them? Or creates a light-pond ripple effect as you press keys? Nobody, probably. But it's really fun to play around with and show off! The lighting is also VERY intense and should be bright enough for anyone as it has 3 different brightness levels in addition to off. You'll need to install the Corsair software to enable all of the features.

+ Very satisfying key-press - You can absolutely feel every key press as you make it. There is no doubt that this is a legitimately mechanical keyboard. I love the range of motion, the sound, and the tactile response.

+ Elevated keys - Most mechanical keyboards will have the large keys deeply recessed in the keyboard's frame. This tends to make them dust/Dorito magnets that are difficult to clean without removing all of the keys. The keys on this board are elevated above the board which makes it much easier to get bits of stuff out from under them without having to perform surgery. This also exposes the red surface underneath the keys that enhances the lighting effect.

+ Pleasant texture - The spacebar is textured like an industrial grip floor and the custom gaming keys are textured to match. The feel is nice and makes it easier to find my hand position in shooters.

+ USB Port - And not just any USB port, but a USB port with its own dedicated USB cable and plug. You'll have no concerns with bandwidth or latency issues due to multiple devices sharing a port with the keyboard. This is simply a pass-through port that supports USB 3.0 functionality. I measure a very consistent 40MB/s transfer rate through this port with a Sandisk Extreme USB 3.0 thumb drive.

+ Simplistic - As much as I would like to have some volume buttons added to this it's nearly perfect with regards to its simplicity. I can't stand keyboards with massive amounts of extra buttons and features.

Cons: - Massive tree-trunk cable - The USB cable for the keyboard has the girth of a construction site heavy duty extension cord. Granted it will probably outlive every other computer component I'll ever own, and it is technically TWO cables in one, but my keyboard tray gets into fights with it.

- Dim secondary key symbols - The special characters on the number keys, the arrows below the numbers on the numpad, and the multimedia symbols on the F keys, etc.. are all significantly more dim than the primary characters.

- Clickity-Clack - I don't mind it at all but my SO has complained that the keyboard is "loud", which for a keyboard that is branded as "Silent" may not be a good sign. It is certainly quieter than many mechanical keyboards I've seen, but definitely not silent. The spacebar in particular makes a lot of noise.

- Non-Unified Corsair Software - I have a Corsair wireless headset, H80iv2 CPU water cooler, MX780 mouse, and now this keyboard. I have no less than 3 separate pieces of Corsair software running in my taskbar to interface with each of these devices (2 of which use the same icon!). Individually I have no issues with the pieces of software, but it would be nice if they would consolidate them more (the mouse and keyboard use the same one, fortunately).

- Key removal tool storage - Every now and then there is a product that includes a level of detail where any small tool used specifically for that device will be stored on the device itself somewhere. This is not one of those products. I will likely lose this little key grabber thing in a matter of days (if my cat doesn't get to it first).

- No dedicated volume buttons - For the past decade or so I've been using a Saitek/Cyborg Eclipse keyboard, which visually is very similar to this one. The Saitek has dedicated volume buttons and I will miss having them. Granted this board allows you to adjust volume with the F keys, and gives you some extra multimedia functions to boot, but it's just not quite as convenient for me. There's a void right above the numpad that is just begging for a volume control...

- Elevated keys - Yes, I listed this as a 'Pro', but there is at least one drawback that I experience with this design. My right hand tends to occasionally press on the menu key right next to the right CTRL button. This is particularly frustrating when typing because my hand will press it and then if I just happen to type a letter that just happens to be a shortcut key for the menu, like 'U' for 'Undo', then annoying stuff happens that sometimes results in me having to retype a bunch of stuff. I would assume that this occurrence would be rare, but I've had to retype at least a few sentences every day for the past week that I've been using this keyboard. I might have to invest in a wrist rest or something to bring my hands up a little higher for this one.

Other Thoughts: Most of the 'Cons" I listed are either just minor points of preference for me or things that I felt might be worth mentioning as they might be a nuisance for other people. I couldn't come up with anything that I felt was worth deducting on the score.

Overall I'm very satisfied with this keyboard. I've used the Saitek/Cyborg keyboard for about a decade and have never had any gripes with it. And it still works great! Now I slightly prefer this new Corsair board. It's possible that I'm just enjoying the experience of having something new and pretty to look at, and maybe I'll eventually switch back to the Saitek. But if I had to make a prediction I'd say that I expect that this keyboard will be in use on my main gaming rig for years to come.

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Matthew H.'s Profile

Display Name: Matthew H.

Date Joined: 04/13/05

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  • First Review: 06/21/05
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