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5 out of 5 eggs I have a new favorite Router.. I feel like such a traitor to my previous one!! 06/27/2016

This review is from: NETGEAR R7800 Nighthawk X4S AC2600 Smart WiFi MU-MIMO Gigabit Router

Pros: 1.) I have a greater coverage area with this device. Chalk it up to the extra antenna, the new chipset, or whatever you like. This thing has probably added 30% to my range.. But more importantly, the areas where I had weaker signal, before, I now have extremely strong signal.

2.) This router doesn’t seem to need to ‘ramp up’ to get to it’s max wireless speeds… it still tops out at the max my ISP provisions me for, obviously, but instead of it taking 10-15seconds to get there.. It pretty much charges out of the gate at full speed.

3.) Storage performance. Ok, so I’m going to admit, I normally don’t care about attached storage speed to routers, instead I recommend people just just BUY a NAS if they want to have storage on their network. I’m not sure if it’s just this device, or what, but I’m starting to reconsider that functionality on routers. Obviously, you really can’t compare the speeds to a full blown NAS, but the performance is ‘Good enough’ to mention it to friends and family.

4.) Stability has been rock solid. If there’s 1 thing I’ve noticed over the last few years, is that I haven’t been able to find a router that can keep multiple weeks of uptime, much less a year…. So far, the 7800 is promising, in that it’s not rebooted on me since I installed it (after the initial firmware update, obviously).. And even more impressively, I’ve not lost wireless connectivity on my 3 ‘monitor’ devices since I installed this router… THAT shocks the heck outta me.

5.) Now.. one thing I’ve discovered, that I find somewhat curious, is the inclusion of a BitTorrent downloader.. Simply called: Netgear Downloader” Built into the router. I assume this is a variant of the transmission client.. And I find it’s inclusion VERY cool. Beyond a few tests, I’ve not used it a whole lot (I’m not really a BT guy, but I know there ARE a bunch of people out there that are… so give it a shot :)

6..) There’s a whole slew of other additions much of what you’ve come to expect from a consumer level router: Parental controls, QoS, WDS, Guest Networks, ReadyShare, ReadyCloud, printer connectivity..

7.) But there’s also some other things a lot of your current mainstream consumer routers still leave out.. Like ipv6 support, STATIC ROUTING, the ability to turn on repeater/bridge/ap modes…

Cons: So what’s the downside? I’m still not a fan of the ‘Genie’ applications that Netgear tries to convince you to use. I understand they’re designed to help the novice users setup and configure their devices.. But that whole thing about giving a man to fish vs teaching him to fish… I can’t help but think it’d be better for the consumer to learn more about how the technology works, vs just making everything overly simplistic…. *Shrug*

Other Thoughts: Full Review:

For the longest time, I’ve been trying to find something better than my current champion device, the Netgear R7000. I’ve recommended it to friends, family, co-workers, clients, and pretty much any stranger I run into on the street… but no matter what, I’m always looking for bigger, better, faster.. Something that makes me look at it with a giant grin, the way I’ve not had since I first encountered the R7000.

A sad day, however, has arrived. Enter probably the best example of what a ‘sequel’ to a piece of technology should be… the Netgear R7800 ‘Nighthawk x4s”... Which is quite a mouthful.

I could spend all day/night telling you the technical ins and outs of this router, but you’ve likely already read that. What you want to know, is real world performance, and in this case, I’m going to be comparing it, directly, to my R7000 series router...Which is actually running DD-WRT at the moment, that makes it an even steeper hill to climb.

For reference, I live in an approximately 1800sq ft home, constructed from mostly wood and drywall. I live in a semi-congested area, as pretty much all of my neighbors are heavily wireless. Right now, my current R7000 covers most of my home without problem, but there are some weak spots. Other than that, when you get to the back end of the house, and then into the backyard and woods behind, the signal degrades quickly. At the far end of the property, we have no signal.

Enter the R7800. I installed this device approximately 2 weeks ago, and I’ve been putting it through it’s paces… So how does it work?

Here’s some things I’ve noticed:

1.) I have a greater coverage area with this device. Chalk it up to the extra antenna, the new chipset, or whatever you like. This thing has probably added 30% to my range.. But more importantly, the areas where I had weaker signal, before, I now have extremely strong signal.

2.) This router doesn’t seem to need to ‘ramp up’ to get to it’s max wireless speeds… it still tops out at the max my ISP provisions me for, obviously, but instead of it taking 10-15seconds to get there.. It pretty much charges out of the gate at full speed.

3.) Storage performance. Ok, so I’m going to admit, I normally don’t care about attached storage speed to routers, instead I recommend people just just BUY a NAS if they want to have storage on their network. I’m not sure if it’s just this device, or what, but I’m starting to reconsider that functionality on routers. Obviously, you really can’t compare the speeds to a full blown NAS, but the performance is ‘Good enough’ to mention it to friends and family.

4.) Stability has been rock solid. If there’s 1 thing I’ve noticed over the last few years, is that I haven’t been able to find a router that can keep multiple weeks of uptime, much less a year…. So far, the 7800 is promising, in that it’s not rebooted on me since I installed it (after the initial firmware update, obviously).. And even more impressively, I’ve not lost wireless connectivity on my 3 ‘monitor’ devices since I installed this router… THAT shocks the heck outta me.

5.) Now.. one thing I’ve discovered, that I find somewhat curious, is the inclusion of a BitTorrent downloader.. Simply called: Netgear Downloader” Built into the router. I assume this is a variant of the transmission client.. And I find it’s inclusion VERY cool. Beyond a few tests, I’ve not used it a whole lot (I’m not really a BT guy, but I know there ARE a bunch of people out there that are… so give it a shot :)

6..) There’s a whole slew of other additions much of what you’ve come to expect from a consumer level router: Parental controls, QoS, WDS, Guest Networks, ReadyShare, ReadyCloud, printer connectivity..

7.) But there’s also some other things a lot of your current mainstream consumer routers still leave out.. Like ipv6 support, STATIC ROUTING, the ability to turn on repeater/bridge/ap modes…

So what’s the downside? I’m still not a fan of the ‘Genie’ applications that Netgear tries to convince you to use. I understand they’re designed to help the novice users setup and configure their devices.. But that whole thing about giving a man to fish vs teaching him to fish… I can’t help but think it’d be better for the consumer to learn more about how the technology works, vs just making everything overly simplistic…. *Shrug*

All in all, I’m happier with this device than I thought I would be, and I’m glad to say it has made it’s way to being my primary router, right now… Now all I have to do, is find a use for my old R7000… perhaps I’ll donate it to a friend that still needs to replace something their ISP provided them :)

FULL TRANSPARENCY: I received this router from Netgear, in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.

READ FULL REVIEW
NETGEAR ReadyNAS 316 6-Bay Network Attached Storage Diskless (RN31600)
  • neweggOwned For: 1 week to 1 month

5 out of 5 eggs Good price for a nice system 10/22/2013

This review is from: NETGEAR ReadyNAS 316 6-Bay Network Attached Storage Diskless (RN31600)

Pros: (in no particular order)

The pricing of this new ReadyNAS series is a actually a sweet spot for the technologically advanced who have a need for this sort of device. On top of that, the performance seems to be significantly better than the ReadyNAS Ultra4 I had prior to this unit.

The amount of addons available via the netgear genie marketplace is growing, and it's cool to see the manufacturer working with independent developers to add more features.

It seems SSH is 'officially' supported on this device, due to the fact there is a simple toggle for it within the ReadyNAS OS now. No more having to find and add the .BIN SSH addon.

Remote access and replication features added into these new units, free of charge, is a nice addition.

Integration with Dropbox is a nice touch, though there are multiple vendors that are offering this now.

Did I mention performance? Going to again. The ability to max out a 1 gig connection with a non-enterprise level device is amazing.

iSCSI support on the device, my VM Boxes thank you.

Snapshot features. No more do I have to listen to my daughter scream because she deleted a file today, that she created 3 days ago. Or that she made changes to it, and doesn't like those changes now.

The tool-less drive caddys are a nice touch as well. Also, the fact that the locks for those caddys are easily accessible.

I've not looked into it much, but apparently there is an AV Solution built into the unit. Which, I assume is a ClamAV version. I don't need it, but some home users could find a use for it, I'm sure.

Near instant availability when creating a new RAID array with thin provisioning. With the past ReadyNAS units, you'd have to create the array, and then walk away for the better portion of a day before you could use the unit. This was due to the raid array building itself and establishing a sync. You don't have to worry about this anymore. Feel free to start using the device right away, and it'll finish it's sync in the background. There will be a bit of performance lost during this initial process, but you're not crippled to the fact that you can't use the device anymore.

The new models of ReadyNAS will let you use expansion units to extend your possible storage to just about whatever level you'd like. (spec sheet claims 64TB is max space with this unit and an expansion bay)

5 Year warranty on the unit itself. That's a massive 'Wow factor' to me, especially in the day of everything having only a 1-3 year warranty. 5 years seems incredible to me.

Quiet, and stays relatively cool, compared to my other NAS devices I've used in the past.

Cons: (again, in no particular order)
The average consumer for this device should be a bit more advanced, and the basic postings on various retailers should indicate this.

Semi steep learning curve for users new to NAS units.
The new UI, while a step up from the old one, still seems a bit unfriendly to novices.

Depending on the situation, the feature-set might be a bit over the top for someone looks for the most basic solution. Not a huge negative, as all the features seem to be able to be turned on and off.

Linux based unit, so someone that's only familar with windows should take care when going into the command line interface to 'poke around'.

Occasional quirk while transferring data via Replication, when using compression. Would just recommend turning it off, to be honest.

Other Thoughts: I'm supposed to mention that I got this unit free of charge from Netgear after asking some specific questions regarding the newer units and providing some personal contact information to Netgear.

Another few things to note:

While I'm been using ReadyNas devices for years, even before Netgear bought Infrant, I can see why some people would have a few problems with their initial setup and configuration. The documentation included was minimal, and most people often just want to plug a device in, and have it 'just work', without doing any reading.

I've ran into a few small issues here and there, nothing big enough to be considered a show stopper, and I'll reiterate my love for the performance on this unit. We have a datacenter and remote offices using various ReadyNAS devices, and while most of them server their purpose, a few models have earned many a 4 letter word from me.

The only other observation I'd like to make, is the fact there are many websites on the net that have done reviews of this unit, and seem to try to indicate this is a consumer level device... I'd like to take the time to really stress that this is NOT something I'd give to my elderly parents and expect them to know how to use. If people keep their expectations realistic with regards to this unit, you'll come out pleasantly surprised with it's performance and features. :)

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SanDisk Extreme 8GB Compact Flash (CF) Flash Card Model SDCFX-008G-A61
  • Verified Owner
  • neweggOwned For: 1 week to 1 month

5 out of 5 eggs Bit pricy, but soo worth it. 04/28/2010

This review is from: SanDisk Extreme 8GB Compact Flash (CF) Flash Card Model SDCFX-008G-A61

Pros: UDMA CF cards are some of the fastest cards available on the market. If you're considering this card, and are willing to spend the $$$ on it, you will most likely not be disappointed.

However, as noted, please be aware.. the performance will depend entirely on your gear (camera or otherwise). Just because you buy a Ferrari engine, and have it mounted in your Gremlin, doesn't mean it's going to perform like a Ferrari.

Do everyone a favor, and ignore the 'Scamdisk' comment below... the user based their review on an unrealistic expectation. Additionally, I'd encourage everyone to research the equipment you're using before investing highly into it.

Cons: Price. As with any current UDMA type CF cards, the price is a bit steeper than normal CF. For some, the speed these cards produce, will not outweigh the price.

Other Thoughts: If you're a professional photographer that uses an of the prosumer to pro level camera bodies, do yourself a favor.. and try to find another local photographer to check the UDMA speeds out. For some photographers (like myself), the longer speed bursts will be beneficial.

For example, I occasionally am asked to do some player shots for sports teams. Starting your burst of photos as a player begins their movement can occasionally turn into disappointment, as you start your review process. Sometimes you'll get a shot that would have been great.... if you'd JUST caught those last few moments...

The ability to snap your shots off.. without ever having to worry about a red LED telling you to 'wait' is amazing.

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Shawn M.'s Profile

Display Name: Shawn M.

Date Joined: 01/14/05

  • Reviews: 4
  • Helpfulness: 4
  • First Review: 12/22/08
  • Last Review: 06/27/16
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