Verified Owner
Ownership: 1 week to 1 month
Good price, leisurely shipping1/21/2019 4:20:55 PM

Pros: Now that H&R Block killed the application.xml discount, Newegg's price of one andrew jackson (on special in mid-January 2019) is hard to beat.

Cons: I used the Super Eggsaver shipping. I put in the order on Friday at 2:30 PM, and it showed up the next Saturday in the mail - 8 days later. It shipped from just outside Cincinnati, OH, and went to a big city about 600 miles away. It shipped via DHL for the long haul, who then handed off to USPS for local delivery.

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It does what it says on the tin. Lasted 11 years in nearly constant service.1/11/2019 2:53:06 PM

Pros: Original, 23 March 2008: Sleeved wiring bundles. Internal fan tach lead is brought out to a connector for your motherboard. Has every kind of power connector there is (so far this week). Appears to have fairly robust construction, and the safety agency approvals are likely genuine, unlike your typical "1000 W for $20!!1!" power supply. Has a hard power switch on the back, which I like; even after all these years, ATX soft power switches and I still don't get along. Voltages are in spec, per BIOS and multimeter measurements. Update, 11 January 2019: It quit after about 11 years of nearly constant service. It went quietly when it died, without taking out any other components in the PC, and with no pyrotechnics or weird smells. It grew from powering 2 GB of memory, two 3.5" hard drives, and integrated video, to 4 GB of memory, four 3.5" hard drives, and a PCI Express 16 video card, without complaint. The PC would use about 100 to 120 W at the wall, depending on what exactly was running. It ran for a few days more than 11 years, with 24/7 service for about 51 weeks a year; it got shut down for occasional long trips out of town. Every year or so I would clean out the power supply with a can of air.

Cons: Original, 23 March 2008: Has every kind of power connector there is (so far this week), so non-gamers will have to figure out a place to stow half of them. Did not ship with delicious cake.

Overall Review: Original, 23 March 2008: What we really need from the PC industry is about twelve more kinds of power connectors. I think the Jones plug is due for a revival; RCA power connectors might also be nice. Octal tube base connectors, anyone? Update, 11 January 2019: I had a power outage yesterday and the PC ran from the UPS like normal. When the power didn't come back after 5 minutes or so, I shut the PC down manually. About half an hour later, once the power was back and stable, I tried to turn the PC back on... no dice. I disconnected everything but the motherboard and still no joy. Swapping in another supply proved that this one was dead. I never did end up using the 6-pin or 8-pin 12 volt connectors. :)

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Low power consumption, small3/31/2018 9:25:17 PM

Pros: This switch replaced a 10/100 switch that was old when I got it in the mid-2000s. That switch had a built-in fan and pulled about 12 watts at the wall, per my Kill-a-watt meter. This Trendnet switch pulls *one watt* at the wall, with four ports active. It's tiny! The old switch was big enough that I could let the Ethernet cables dangle off the front of it and the switch didn't go anywhere. With this switch, I had to re-arrange the cables a bit so they wouldn't pull the switch off of the shelf. It has a metal casing all around. The front has a plastic overlay with the logo, model number, and LED labels. All nine indicator LEDs (one power, eight port status) are green and on the front. The power light is on steady when power is on. The port status light is off for no connection, on solid for a connection of any speed (10, 100, or 1000 megabit), and blinks as data flows on that port. There are no lights in the corners of each Ethernet jack. The UL listing on the power supply appears to be genuine.

Cons: Ethernet jacks are plastic. Not a big deal on a switch that goes for one Andrew Jackson, though. Doesn't have one of those nifty "percent utilization" LED bar graphs - but again, one Andrew Jackson. Doesn't have a Bayonet Neill–Concelman connector. (Ask your parents.)

Overall Review: The power supply is rated 5 V, 1 A, so if you were hacking up a mobile application for it, you might be able to power it from 2 USB ports, or four NiMH batteries in series (4.8 V). I haven't tried this, though.

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Verified Owner
Ownership: 1 week to 1 month
Good price for genuine Power-Sonic batteries3/31/2018 8:59:51 PM

Pros: The price per battery from Newegg/AtBatt was about 40% lower than an electronics parts distributor that I have ordered this exact same battery from in the past. That distributor also charges more for shipping, so for two batteries delivered to my door, the Newegg/AtBatt price is still about 39% less than that distributor. A lot of online sellers will say something like "Power-Sonic replacement battery", and show a picture of a Power-Sonic battery, but when you scroll down and read the fine print, they are actually shipping some other brand. AtBatt doesn't seem to do that; they sell Power-Sonic and other brands, but they clearly label what brand you are going to get. I ordered a Power-Sonic and got a Power-Sonic. I ordered two of these to replace the batteries in an APC UPS. I have tried other brands of battery, but I feel that Power-Sonic is the most reliable for the price. These batteries typically last 5 to 7 years in this UPS. At my location, there are power outages between 5 and 10 times a year where these batteries need to run the PC for several minutes, and maybe a dozen or two additional short power glitches (during storms) where they need to run the PC for a few seconds. The batteries I got both had a manufacturing date code of late July, 2017. I got them in late March, 2018. When I got them, they had an open-circuit voltage of 12.75 V. Before I installed them on the UPS, I charged each one on the bench. My charger doesn't have a coulomb counter, but based on an ammeter and the clock, I put about 2.3 A-h of charge into each one. In other words, their state of charge was at about 67% when I received them. This was not a problem for me, and probably won't be a problem for you - a lot of equipment that uses these batteries has a built-in charger. Just don't expect these to arrive fully charged.

Cons: Not much of a con, but: the batteries were approximately 8 months old when I got them. This is within my expectations, and within Power-Sonic's recommendation (one year), but it's always nice to get fresher batteries.

Overall Review: IMPORTANT: This size battery can come with either 1/4" wide (0.25", 6.3 mm) terminals, like this listing, or 3/16" wide (0.187", 4.7 mm) terminals. Power-Sonic designates the 1/4" wide ones as "F2" in the part number, while the 3/16" wide ones have "F1" in the part number. Make sure you know which one you need before you order! In my experience, UPSes usually take batteries with 0.25"/F2 terminals, and things like alarm panels take the 0.187"/F1 terminals, but look at your equipment to be sure. Adapters between the two terminal sizes are available, but the adapters may not work well in all applications, because of available space, exposed conductors, or current draw. Shipping was prompt, and the two batteries arrived in a cardboard box with custom polystyrene packaging that protected the batteries well. My order shipped from Louisville, Kentucky.

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Works well. Appears to be used, though.10/22/2017 11:00:48 PM

Pros: I ended up with two 2 GB sticks, each labeled "KVR800D2N6K2/4G", "KIT OF 2, 1.8 V". The chips and boards were clean, but there were witness marks on the card-edge connector, where I believe they were previously installed in a socket. They are only about 3/4" (19 mm) tall. It appears to be genuine Kingston RAM. The hologram stickers look OK. All the text matches on the two hologram stickers. On the part number stickers, three out of the four lines match; the third line is different and might be a serial number (it is of the form xxLxx-x9xHxx-xWxxB). Each stick has sixteen Hynix HY5PS1G831C DRAM chips on it, plus the SPD EEPROM. The Hynix chips are additionally marked "KOR", "FP-S6 C 103V", and a varying line of the form "MWHABXEnxxn". I believe that "103V" probably means the third week of 2011 - more below. I installed these sticks with no other RAM. The system ran through one full set of Memtest86+ (about 30 minutes) and didn't show any errors. Memtest86+ detected the timing as 6-6-6-18. decode-dimms (Linux) also agrees with the 6-6-6-18 timing. It also says the RAM is "SSTL 1.8V", and supports CAS 6, 5, and 4. (I haven't tried it at anything besides CAS 6, though.) It also identifies Kingston as the manufacturer, manufacturing location 0x06, manufacturing date 2011-W10, and a 32-bit serial number for each stick. The serial numbers are relatively close to each other - about 5,000 numbers apart. Running it in the system, it seems to work OK. I can have a couple of separate instances of Firefox running and it doesn't swap, which is not the case when I had only 2 GB of RAM installed. As I write this, the system has been up for about 7 hours, running various applications, with no apparent problems.

Cons: Given the fact that these didn't come in original Kingston packaging, the probable January 2011 date on the RAM chips, the March 2011 date in the onboard EEPROM, and the marks on the edge connectors, I am pretty sure these are used. (I bought this RAM in October 2017). That's not the end of the world, but I wish it was disclosed somewhere on the ad. On the other hand, maybe these were enough clues that the modules were used: 1) This RAM was one andrew jackson, while the equivalent parts from mooshy kin, g'z kill, or coarse air start at twice that on Newegg. 2) Kingston sells these modules new on their site, but only on a build-to-order basis, and two modules would be about three times what this pair was. 3) DDR2 RAM is not exactly the latest technology sensation. The packaging was... economical. It shipped in a padded kraft mailing bag, 5" x 7.5". Inside that was a pink static-shield plastic bag, heat seamed down the middle to make a compartment for each stick, and then across the end to close it. It didn't have the plastic clamshell trays that new RAM typically comes in. On the other hand, free USPS shipping.

Overall Review: My Gigabyte motherboard has an AMD processor and AMD 740G chipset; the memory seems to work just fine with it. (In this era, some RAM was picky as to whether you had an Intel or AMD chipset.) My motherboard has only 2 RAM slots - it had 2x 1 GB coarse air sticks before this upgrade. I wanted it to run a little better than it did, but I didn't want it bad enough to go for a newer motherboard, CPU, etc. For one andrew jackson, this RAM woke it up enough to buy me another year or two of use, so I think it's a good deal. The parts shipped from Boca Raton, Florida, via USPS first-class mail.

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Verified Owner
Ownership: 1 week to 1 month
Does what it says on the tin2/13/2010 12:26:58 PM

Pros: Ordered one to replace an existing supply and it pretty much fit right in the hole (but see "Other thoughts"). Adequate cable length and number of connectors. The CPU connector was fine; it is the usual "20+4" type so you can use it with a 20-pin or 24-pin motherboard.

Cons: The SATA power connectors are the kind where the connector body sticks out at a right angle to the wires. You can see this in the photos if you look closely. For one of my drives it would have been nicer to have the kind where the body is in line with the wires, but I made it work. Doesn't come with any screws. OK, anybody buying this probably has a 55-gallon drum of old computer screws sitting in the corner, but I figured I'd mention it. In my case, the supply I was replacing only had 3 screw holes and therefore 3 screws, even though the chassis had 4 holes. This supply had screw holes for every chassis hole, so I got some screws from my stash and used 4. (Normally I wouldn't care, except that this particular system is going to get shipped from time to time.)

Overall Review: Hang onto your old supply until you get this one - you might need the bracket off your old one. Details: The dimensions on these don't seem to be quite as standard as with an ATX supply. The screw holes for the rear panel lined up fine, but the holes in the "foot" (on the end of the supply with the wires) didn't line up with the holes in the chassis - this supply is not as deep as the one it replaced. The "foot" is a bracket held to the supply with two screws; my old supply had a similar "foot" bracket that was longer. I took the "foot" bracket off the old supply, enlarged one of the holes in the bracket a little (the spacing for the screws that hold the "foot" bracket to the supply is also a little different), put the bracket it on this supply, and everything fit. Per Athena's Web site, the only difference between this one and the AP-U2ATX45P that Newegg also sells is that the P model has power factor correction.

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It does what it says on the tin3/23/2008 4:13:46 PM

Pros: Sleeved wiring bundles. Internal fan tach lead is brought out to a connector for your motherboard. Has every kind of power connector there is (so far this week). Appears to have fairly robust construction, and the safety agency approvals are likely genuine, unlike your typical "1000 W for $20!!1!" power supply. Has a hard power switch on the back, which I like; even after all these years, ATX soft power switches and I still don't get along. Voltages are in spec, per BIOS and multimeter measurements.

Cons: Has every kind of power connector there is (so far this week), so non-gamers will have to figure out a place to stow half of them. Did not ship with delicious cake.

Overall Review: What we really need from the PC industry is about twelve more kinds of power connectors. I think the Jones plug is due for a revival; RCA power connectors might also be nice. Octal tube base connectors, anyone?

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It's great, when it runs3/23/2008 3:40:09 PM

Pros: When it's working, it's great! I run Debian 4.0r3 "Etch" (2.6.18 kernel, 64 bit) on it and it's nice; around 6430 BogoMips per core. No trouble booting the install CD or using the stock kernel; building a custom kernel also went well. You do need updated lm-sensors to talk to the ADT7475 fan/thermal chip. The Q-connector is handy for the small case plugs (pwr reset etc). Mine arrived with a few pins bent; they should plug them into a block of foam before shipping. You get ones for USB and 1394 as well; not as useful if you have 1-piece USB plugs, but can be handy: I had a 1x5 plug from the card reader and a 2x5 plug from the case USB ports; plugging in the 1x5 to the shrouded mobo connector would have wasted 1 USB port. Used the USB Q-connector to plug in the 1x5 and half of the 2x5 plug. My build: Athlon 64 X2 Windsor 6400+, 2x 1GB DDR2-800 Kingston ValueRAM, 2x Seagate Barracuda ES 500 GB 7200 RPM SATA 2, Pioneer 20x DVD+/-R, Mitsumi card reader/floppy, Antec TP3 650 W.

Cons: I bought despite the bad reviews here and elsewhere. 2 kinds of bad reviews: "NG with DDR2-800 RAM" from ~2007 (apparently fixed by newer BIOS) and "DOA/died gradually" (ongoing). I wasn't worried about 1 and I attributed 2 to bad luck and/or poor ESD practices. I whipped out my mat and wrist strap and built the system and all seemed to be well at first; long-running Seti@Home processes sometimes crashed but I attributed that (wrongly) to 32/64 bit issues. Over a few weeks, though, every-day apps like Firefox and even tin started crashing for no reason; then it started not wanting to boot. memtest86 reported various memory errors; on reboot it would report errors in _different places_! I tried using some RAM that was performing well in another machine - no change. I stepped the memory down to DDR2-667 in the BIOS and that worked for a couple of weeks before the crashes proliferated again; now at 533 and it's working well enough to get online and buy a non-Asus replacement.

Overall Review: From Newegg's point of view, this is a perfect product; it outlasts the 30-day return period and becomes Asus' problem, not theirs. They will probably also sell some extended warranties and competing motherboards out of the deal. Asus tech support is kind of slow; they claim two-business-day response, but don't believe it. According to other people who have had to RMA this same board, expect at least a few weeks to turn it around. A reasonable explanation might be that Asus is growing and having QC issues, or that they haven't nailed down the lead-free/RoHS solder process yet. A conspiracy theory is that the money Microsoft paid to Asus for the Xbox parts was contaminated with bogons, which are now loose in the Asus plant and causing mayhem.

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It does what it says on the tin1/27/2008 6:33:05 PM

Pros: Works fine for me, although I've only used it so far to read pressed CDs and DVDs and burn CD-Rs. Seems reasonably quiet in operation.

Cons: It's an OEM drive with no cables, which isn't a big deal; my new motherboard came with the IDE cable it needs. The motherboard didn't come with an analog CD audio cable, though, so I had to get one from the parts pile. Not really the fault of this DVD drive, and most people will be using digital audio anyway, but it's a small thing to watch out for.

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It does what it says on the tin1/27/2008 6:26:11 PM

Pros: Convenient packaging for newer cases that have only one 3.5" slot. All I've thrown at it so far are CF and SD cards from a few different digital cameras, but it reads all of them just fine. Floppy worked fine for updating the BIOS on my motherboard.

Cons: Not as many mounting-hole options as your typical 3.5" floppy or hard drive. You can get it fastened in OK, but you have to think about it a little.

Overall Review: Why I got a floppy drive: 1) I still have to support a couple of older machines that don't always want to boot from CD, so sometimes I need to make boot floppies. 2) Anyone who tries to update their BIOS from within Windows is being naughty in the sight of the LORD. 3) I know you can update your BIOS from a USB stick, but I'm not sure about this new-fangled USB thing yet. 4) It really annoys all the young whippersnappers with their clear side panels and cold-cathode lamps.

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Works well1/21/2008 11:45:35 AM

Pros: Works well in an Asus M2N-SLI with Athlon 64 X2 3.2 GHz. Plugged them in, they were recognized, overnight burn-in went fine. I still have trouble believing top when it says "Swap used: 0k". Running at stock settings, no overclocking.

Cons: Didn't come with free candy.

Overall Review: The instruction pamphlet is in 7 languages.

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Verified Owner
Ownership: 1 day to 1 week
Nice case1/21/2008 11:34:27 AM

Pros: The usual high-quality fit and finish from Antec. Captive thumbscrews on the left side panel and the hard disk fan panel are a nice touch. The internal cable hooks work well for organizing the front-panel cables. Heavy, but that seems to help make it quiet. On the other hand, I'm only running the stock rear fan, stock power supply fan, and stock CPU fan (AMD Athlon 64 X2 Windsor 3.2 GHz retail), so there's not that much noise to begin with.

Cons: The 5.25-3.5 adapter is tricksy - it doesn't have as many holes as some others. You *will* need to make a few trial fits if you've got a 3.5 device that needs front panel access. The power LED doesn't fit very close to its light pipe, so there is a light leak through the side vents on the front panel. A bit of heat-shrink tubing might help here. None of the screws that came with the case were a really good fit for either inch or metric nut drivers. The Phillips slots were OK. The provided 120 mm rear fan just has two wires and a hard-drive power connector. I plugged it into the "fan only" connector on the power supply for speed control, but it would be nice if the fan had a three-pin connector so the motherboard could control it and report on it. If you've a PCI card with a connector that's close to the top of the bracket, and it's in the bottom slot, attaching the external cable might be tricky: the curve of the slot recess is a little tight. I solved by shuffling cards ar

Overall Review: It comes with 4 pairs of rails-one pair is already installed on the 5.25-3.5 adapter. Three of the rails are hiding on the bottom of the internal drive bays. It has power and disk LEDs, but NewEgg's caption is wrong. The little black oval at the bottom left of the external bays only has the disk LED. The power LED is a clear ring around the power button. The shoulder screws needed for the silicone hard drive grommets are oddballs; there are enough to do four drives, but I knew they would disappear if I put them in my pile of case parts. I got some 6-32 nuts, put the extra screws in the unused grommets, and put the nuts on the screws so they don't go anywhere. Now I won't have to hunt for the screws when I add a drive. I wish it had a couple of spare DB25 and DB9 knock-outs on the case, but that went out of style when ATX came in. The gross weight as printed on the box by Antec is 25.3 lbs, and my (traceable to NIST) bathroom scale agrees. Got charged for 28 pounds, though.

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It does what it says on the tin1/21/2008 11:00:06 AM

Pros: Works fine so far in an Asus M2N-SLI with 2 GB of RAM. At stock settings (not overclocked) in about 18 C ambient, it runs around 38-40 C with normal desktop stuff (Web browser, email, photo editing, etc). Running Seti@Home overnight bumped it up to around 52-56 C. (Thermal environment: stock heatsink/fan that comes with CPU, Antec Solo case with stock 120 mm rear fan, Antec Truepower Trio 650 W PS with stock bottom fan.) It runs just a little bit faster than my old K6-2 400 MHz.

Cons: The stock heatsink comes with what looks and feels like a thermal pad on the bottom. It seems to work OK, but for heavy load, grease might be a little better.

Overall Review: One core always reports about 4 C higher than the other; is this just the tolerance of the internal sensors, or does it reflect a real difference? The instruction sheet is in 15 languages. "Diffused in Germany" would be a good album or song name.

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