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Christopher E.

Christopher E.

Joined on 07/15/04

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Product Reviews
product reviews
  • 11
Most Favorable Review

Excellent drive

Seagate BarraCuda 7200.10 ST3320620A 320GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache IDE Ultra ATA100 / ATA-6 3.5" Hard Drive (Perpendicular Recording) Bare Drive
Seagate BarraCuda 7200.10 ST3320620A 320GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache IDE Ultra ATA100 / ATA-6 3.5" Hard Drive (Perpendicular Recording) Bare Drive

Pros: Very quiet, fast, and reliable. Excellent for raid. Works with no problems under Linux.

Cons: This drive tends to get a bit warmish. Make sure you have enough cooling.

Overall Review: I'm tired of seeing reviews saying that these drives don't have the advertised capacity. Seagate rates the capacity using base 10 counting (gigabyte = 1,000,000,000 bytes) whereas your operating system uses base 2 counting (gigabyte = 1,073,741,824 bytes). Furthermore, your file system will reserve some of the disk space for things like the journal. In short, no you will not get 320 full gigabytes, but this is a standard practice amongst drive manufacturers, so get used to it. For those wondering, the unformatted drive has fdisk reporting exactly 320072933376 bytes (ymmv).

Most Critical Review

Practically DOA

Zotac ZBOX-ID80-U Intel NM10 Black Mini / Booksize Barebone System
Zotac ZBOX-ID80-U Intel NM10 Black Mini / Booksize Barebone System

Pros: It looked pretty nice, and dang it's slim. Very quiet.

Cons: Heat. Let me make this clear, this was placed next to an AC unit that keeps the room a nice 68 degrees (F). So there's no way this was environmental. I plugged this thing in and began installing windows. Barely got to the first boot and the video started becoming corrupt. As the minutes passed it got progressively worse until the screen was too corrupt to read. Opened it back up and the CPU was burning up. I'm letting it cool down right now. Perhaps installing the drivers will help (chuckles to self). Speaking of drivers, the [redacted] folks who made this thing decided to distribute the drivers on a CD-ROM. Seriously guys?

Overall Review: 68 degree room, good ventilation, 1 keyboard, 1 monitor, 1 mouse, and a SSD which frankly stayed cooler than anything else inside that box. No way this heating problem is my fault. Oh and the fan on this thing is a joke.

Cut my hands up

Rosewill RSV-S8 - 8-Bay 2.5" & 3.5" Hot-Swappable RAID Storage Enclosure System Bundled with PCIe Controller Card - 120mm Cooling Fan, Port Multiplier, Tray Design, RAID 0 / 1 / 5 / 10 / 5 + Spare / S
Rosewill RSV-S8 - 8-Bay 2.5" & 3.5" Hot-Swappable RAID Storage Enclosure System Bundled with PCIe Controller Card - 120mm Cooling Fan, Port Multiplier, Tray Design, RAID 0 / 1 / 5 / 10 / 5 + Spare / S

Pros: Technically speaking, the thing works. I have a 4TB raid 5 array working under Linux, and has (thus far) not caused any problems.

Cons: When the unit arrived ALL of the removable trays had been jarred (presumably during shipping) such that removing them required extreme force (read bending metal). They had been knocked out of their plastic tracks (yes, the guiding tracks for the trays are plastic) and the force of removing the bays caused half of them to snap, ensuring that each tray relied on the tray below it for support. When I was done, the whole thing looked like some kind of massacre, and my blood was all over the gnarled metal. Copious hydrogen peroxide was required. I can't overemphasize the shoddy design of this thing. Perhaps if any care was taken to... oh I don't know... package this thing as though it were in any way delicate (if that's too indirect: put some foam in the box!) On top of all of that the sides of the thing bow out so that the side panel doesn't fit properly -- before I even began trying to remove the trays. You know that scene in office space where they beat the printer? It comes like that.

Overall Review: I hate to done on about the problems when despite its grotesque appearance and construction it does actually work as advertised. Still if you are on the fence about this, you could probably do better with a pair of scissors, some PVC pipe, glue, and an eSata controller.

Works fine, check firmware

Seagate BarraCuda 7200.11 ST31000333AS 1TB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive Bare Drive
Seagate BarraCuda 7200.11 ST31000333AS 1TB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive Bare Drive

Pros: I bought three of these drives, and they're all working fine in a zfs raid 5 setup (freebsd if you care).

Cons: That dumb firmware bug everyone is talking about.

Overall Review: None of my drives were affected by the firmware bug. If you order these drives, you MUST check Seagate's website to see if your exact serial number is affected. If it is, there is a firmware update you can download. I would post the link, but they don't like urls in the reviews. Go to Seagate's website, click on the "knowledge base" link on the left. On the knowledge base page near the right of the page, type "207931" into the search box (click search), and click on the first link under the FAQ section, entitled "Firmware Recommendations for Barracuda 7200.11, ES.2 SATA, and DiamondMax 22 Drives[207931]". Hope this is helpful.

Excellent, and works with FreeBSD

CISCO AIR-PI21AG-A-K9 Wireless Adapter IEEE 802.11a/b/g PCI Up to 54Mbps Wireless Data Rates
CISCO AIR-PI21AG-A-K9 Wireless Adapter IEEE 802.11a/b/g PCI Up to 54Mbps Wireless Data Rates

Pros: Easy to set up, easy to install (yeah, the wire is permanently attached, get over it). Very strong signal. Best of all it works with FreeBSD with very little effort.

Cons: Price, but you get what you pay for.

Overall Review: Probably works with Linux being an Atheros based card.

Yes, there really are 500 GB

Seagate BarraCuda 7200.9 ST3500641A 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache IDE Ultra ATA100 / ATA-6 3.5" Hard Drive Bare Drive
Seagate BarraCuda 7200.9 ST3500641A 500GB 7200 RPM 16MB Cache IDE Ultra ATA100 / ATA-6 3.5" Hard Drive Bare Drive

Pros: Good drive, fits nicely into my external enclosure.

Cons: None so far.

Overall Review: Ignore what Chewy says. The hard drive manufacturer rates the capacity by its base-10 capacity. Windows, Linux, and the rest rate it by base-2. Look at the bytes, not the gigabytes and you'll see that they're technically correct. It would be nice if some day the manufacturers would join the rest of the computer world and call 1024 bytes a kilobyte instead of 1000.