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RICHARD B.

RICHARD B.

Joined on 12/13/08

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Product Reviews
product reviews
  • 2
Most Favorable Review

SSID must be broadcast or it won't connect!

D-Link AirePremier DAP-2310 High Power Wireless-N Gigabit PoE Access Point with AP Manager Controller
D-Link AirePremier DAP-2310 High Power Wireless-N Gigabit PoE Access Point with AP Manager Controller

Pros: It packs a lot of functionality into one unit and supports lots of security standards.

Cons: To work as a client, e.g. to enable a wired device to connect to a WiFi network, the wireless network MUST be broadcasting the network SSID! I expect the same is true for any other similar modes of operation, too. I've never encountered another device like it in this respect. It doesn't matter that you can manually enter the network name; it must be broadcast. I wasted hours figuring that one out, which brings me to the documentation. At times, the docs are clear but more often it assumes the user knows more than is likely to be the case. Would it really be too much to include a diagram of how the different modes of operation (client, AP, etc.) enable various bits of gear to communicate or the advantages of one mode over another when there is overlap? Or have a large-print warning about the need to have the SSID broadcast? The WAP also comes with a CD of SW but no up-front explanation of what it does or if you need it at all, which in my case I eventually determined I did not.

12/20/2013
Most Critical Review

Works well but older devices would not connect due to one default setting

ASUS RT-AX86U AX5700 Dual Band WiFi 6 Gaming Router 802.11ax, up to 2500sq ft & 35+ Devices, Mobile Game Mode, Lifetime Free Internet Security, Mesh WiFi support, Gaming Port, Adaptive QoS
ASUS RT-AX86U AX5700 Dual Band WiFi 6 Gaming Router 802.11ax, up to 2500sq ft & 35+ Devices, Mobile Game Mode, Lifetime Free Internet Security, Mesh WiFi support, Gaming Port, Adaptive QoS

Pros: - Great interface, - Better coverage than RT-AX68U - Working well as AiMesh master in Access Point mode

Cons: - Horrible wired setup experience in that input data was ignored. A friend and I also had the same experience with an RT-AX68U - Wasted hours figuring out a default WiFi parameter prevented an old iPad and old Dell laptop from connecting

Overall Review: I bought an RT-AX68U (yes, that's sixty eight) a few weeks ago knowing that it probably wouldn't provide all the coverage I needed (4000 sq ft house with 150' deep back yard) but I wanted to see how well it did to judge what I should buy for a second router, i.e. another 68U or an 86U. I had previous experience with an RT-ac51U so I knew I'd like the interface. The 68U setup sorta went well except a bunch of input data (e.g. SSIDs and PWs) was obviously ignored once I logged in. A friend had the same experience, too. The 68U worked well enough for the front half of the house but I obviously need more oomph in a second router if I wanted anything close to decent coverage in the backyard. I settled on the 86U running as the AiMesh master in access point mode. I had the same setup experience (ignored input data) but the real fun began when I tried to connect all my devices. An old iPad and an old Dell laptop would not connect to the mesh on 2.4 or 5 GHz even though they worked with the 68U. I spent hours trying to figure out the problem, eventually setting up the 68U and 86U as separate access points. Everything connected with the 68U but not the 86U so it wasn't a mesh-only problem. Turns out the 86U had "Protected Management Frames" (never even heard of it before) enabled by default on the 86U. Once it was disabled, all was well, including after re-enabling the AiMesh. Why any router would be shipped with such a default setting is beyond me. Many people would just return the thing as defective. The 86U User Guide was no help and I was also very annoyed at the time that ASUS did not even have a User Guide for the 68U on their website.