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Timothy R.

Timothy R.

Joined on 03/25/06

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Product Reviews
product reviews
  • 35
Most Favorable Review

So what the bleep is a switch and why do I need one?

TP-Link 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Network Switch | Ethernet Splitter | Sturdy Metal w/ Shielded Ports | Plug-and-Play | Traffic Optimization | Unmanaged (TL-SG108)
TP-Link 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Network Switch | Ethernet Splitter | Sturdy Metal w/ Shielded Ports | Plug-and-Play | Traffic Optimization | Unmanaged (TL-SG108)

Pros: There are already many fine reviews on this switch, so rather than just throw out some more data, I figured that I'd take this particular review in a bit of a different direction. Hey, you may have just happened to click on this and think "Is that what I need...I mean, I think that's what I need...isn't it?" So, what's a switch? For most of us, a switch is a doohickey that allows one or more computer(s) to be linked up, thus creating a home network (this is referred to as a Local Area Network or LAN). Essentially, switches help "make up" a network. But, before we get into the specifics of a switch, let's go over some very basic networking... Generally, a typical setup for a home user will find a coaxial cable going to a modem, then a network cable going from the modem to a router (a DSL setup will be similar). Thus, so far we have: Modem --> Internet (referred to as a Wide Area Network or WAN Router --> "Joins" the internet (WAN) to our home network (LAN) OK, so where does the switch come in? Aha! If you've got a router, you've probably ALREADY got a switch! Surprise! Surprise! Yep, those (probably) four ports on the back of that router of yours is a switch. Cool, huh? Well then, how does this TP-LINK switch help me? Maybe four ports just ain't enough for a Geek like yourself. You've got computers all over the freakin' place and, by Godfrey, you wanna be all networked up. Plus, you jus can't stand wireless (not enough security, too slow, too unreliable). Yeah, yeah, that's me alright, so what can I do about it? Answer: You buy this switch, Bubba! Then you take one of those purty little network cables that you had running outta that router of yours and you stick into one of those neato ports on this wonderful switch, giving you SEVEN more potential hookups (unless you wanna buy another wonderful switch...and another...etc...giving you a potentially unlimited number of hookups). Or perhaps you'd like to run some internet out to that garage apartment of yours -- you know, the one you have to stay in sometimes when that significant other finds out how much significant moola you spent on significantly cool stuff from Newegg. Easy enough: You haul your wonderful switch out to that wonderful garage apartment, then you run an Ethernet cable from the back of your wonderful router, eventually sticking it into one of the marvelous ports on the front of that outstanding switch. Whoohoo! Now you can buy even more stuff from Newegg.com while in shameful exile. To make a long-winded story short, when you buy a switch, you're really just enabling more connections than the four that are provided by your router. Whew! That was easy. As for this PARTICULAR switch 1. It's metal, sturdy -- and looks pretty darn good 2. It runs cool 3. It can be mounted on a wall, or (of course) a flat surface 4. Hookup is a snap -- a cable goes from your router into ANY of the switch ports (switches are smart, so they know what comes and

Cons: If you wanna mount this baby on a wall, rafter, etc. you have to screw your two screws 11mm (approx 4 3/8") apart, then BLINDLY slide the unit over top of the screw heads. Absolutely my LEAST favorite way of mounting things to a wall. I'm guessing that most of us have clocks, pictures, etc. that mount this way, and IMO it's a real PITA. Would have preferred tabs on each corner of the switch to screw a screw through. But, then again, not everyone is gonna feel that way. Ports are on the front of the unit, power is on the back. A setup that's probably good for some situations and downright lousy for others. Just letting you know. Could probably nitpick some other things if I really wanted to, but nothing -- not even yours truly -- is perfect. Frankly, my dear, this is a darn fine switch. If you're looking for a darn fine switch to call your own, you've found one (darn fine switch, that is).

Overall Review: Sincerely hope this rambling, long-winded diatribe helps someone, somewhere, at some time. Happy switching!

Most Critical Review

Very Bad in all aspects

SABRENT TV-ATSC ATSC & Digital HDTV/Analog TV Tuner PCI Card
SABRENT TV-ATSC ATSC & Digital HDTV/Analog TV Tuner PCI Card

Pros: Newegg's outstanding customer service. While not having anything to do with the product, at least it made the experience a bit more digestible.

Cons: No documentation of any sort included with product. Software will not install properly, Windows keeps looking for a specified driver that is not on the included Mini CD.

Overall Review: This product needs to be pulled from Newegg's sales. I will be returning it, as did another reviewer. Best bet is to not purchase it to start with.

Typical Seasonic

SeaSonic M12II 620 Bronze 620W ATX12V V2.3 / EPS 12V V2.91 SLI Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Full Modular Active PFC Power Supply
SeaSonic M12II 620 Bronze 620W ATX12V V2.3 / EPS 12V V2.91 SLI Ready 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified Full Modular Active PFC Power Supply

Pros: Typical, meaning that they work as they're supposed to, put out the specs that they're supposed to, and do so without any fuss, bother, or funny noises. I've never failed to be pleased with any Seasonic power supply that I've ever purchased (and it's been quite a few) -- something that cannot be said for some of the other brands.

Cons: A person could literally die of old age waiting for their rebate.

Overall Review: It's to the point that Seasonic is the only power supply that I'll buy. Being a manufacturer and not just a distributor, a consumer knows exactly what they're getting when buying a Seasonic -- a huge advantage.

11/20/2017

Just an FYI

GIGABYTE GA-J1800N-D2H Intel Dual-Core Celeron J1800 SoC (2.41 GHz) Mini ITX Motherboard / CPU / VGA Combo
GIGABYTE GA-J1800N-D2H Intel Dual-Core Celeron J1800 SoC (2.41 GHz) Mini ITX Motherboard / CPU / VGA Combo

Pros: Just as an FYI, as per the specs on the manufacturers web page, this board is certified for use with Windows 8.0/8.1 only

Cons: See above

Responsive for everyday computing

GIGABYTE GA-C1037UN Intel Dual-core Celeron 1037U (1.8 GHz) Intel NM70 Mini ITX Motherboard / CPU / VGA Combo
GIGABYTE GA-C1037UN Intel Dual-core Celeron 1037U (1.8 GHz) Intel NM70 Mini ITX Motherboard / CPU / VGA Combo

Pros: 100% solid caps 60mm CPU Fan (vs 40mm for some other brand boards) ddr3 1600 ram Obvious high quality construction Performs much better than the AMD e350's (I own both a Gigabyte and an Asus board with E350's) at a not-much-higher price point Passmark Benchmark Score: AMD E350 -- 762 Celeron 1037u -- 1733 17 watts!

Cons: USB 2.0 only one sata 6gbs (nitpicking)

Overall Review: Board is quite capable for net surfing and the like. Plays HD movies with no problem. Unless you're looking to game, this will suffice for most people Fulfills the expectations that I had (but didn't get) with the E350's from AMD. Hey, I'm almost exclusively an AMD guy when it comes to my builds, but this thing's price-performance ratio scores a big win for Intel. WIn 7 WEI: CPU -- 5.8 Gaming Graphics -- 6.2 WIndows Aero -- 5.5 As a comparison, the newer AMD A6-5200 embedded 25-watt quad-core will score about a 6.2 on the above three, but the only board available on Newegg (as of this review -- 1/29/14) with that CPU is nearly twice as expensive as this board. Quite frankly, this little board has me a bit amazed at its capabilities. Will probably buy another.

Play that Funky Music, Geek Boy

Netgear Powerline AV 200Mbps Pass Thru + USB Port (XAUB2511)
Netgear Powerline AV 200Mbps Pass Thru + USB Port (XAUB2511)

Pros: Let me preface this review by saying that I'm gonna ignore the Newegg “Pros and Cons” conventions and am just gonna freestyle it, so you (dear reader) also please feel free to ignore the pre-inserted stuff and just read along. In other words, what you see written under the “Pros” or “Cons” ain't necessarily so – pros or cons, that is. Enough baloney, enough with the small talk, enough foreplay, to heck with the preliminaries, so let's dive right in: ***What is it?*** Although utilizing the electrical wiring of your house (for network cabling) may sound like some kinda dubious junk that you'd find being advertised by some loudmouthed Australian jerk on a 2am infomercial, this product actually works extremely well. Rest assured, it IS a proven technology. ***What do you get?*** When you excitedly rip open your box (like I did) you'll find (quantity in parentheses): (1) XAV1601 POWERLINE ADAPTER – this plugs into your wall power outlet, and connects to your network (router, switch, etc.) Dimensions 4 1/8” tall x 2 1/4” wide x 2 1/8” thick (not counting electrical prongs) (1) XAU2511 POWERLINE ADAPTER – this plugs into a separate wall outlet and acts the “receiving” adapter. This is where you will plug your printer, PC speakers, or hard drive Dimensions 5 1/8” tall x 2 3/8” wide x 1 1/2” thick (not counting electrical prongs) (2) ETHERNET CABLES, 78” long (nice, finally some included cables of a sufficient length. Thanks, Netgear) (1) USB to AUDIO CABLE, 72” long (DON'T LOSE THIS!) (1) SOFTWARE CD

Cons: ***How well does it work?*** The product claims to work as a music extender, an Ethernet adapter, a USB printer adapter, and finally, a USB hard drive adapter. So, does it do any (or all) that it claims? A) Music Extender: I tried it with both 2.0 and 2.1 powered speakers. Both performed flawlessly. Kinda amazed me, really. You simply plug the male mini-jack from the speakers into the female mini-jack adapter, connect up with a mouse click (using the supplied software) and you're good to go. I also – just for the heck of it – tried this with a usb-powered sound card and a 5.1 setup. Gave me the dreaded “blue screen of death,” which, by the way, was a first for me with windows 7. Eh, the product made no claims to work with such a setup, so no eggs can be deducted. Still, instinct tells me that this might even work with some tinkering. Conclusion? A+ on the music extender (PS: Make sure the volume controls on your speakers are turned down – unless, of course, you wanna scare the @*$@*Y$! outta yourself like I did.) B) Ethernet adapter: Really nothing needed here but to plug your ethernet cable into both adapters. Transferred a 7.5 Gig .iso file at approx 6.25 MB/second, compared to 6.55 MB/second from a wireless N setup. Conclusion? Not the fastest, but secure and works fine. C) USB Printer: Tried it on an old Lexmark printer that has never networked well. Works just dandy with this setup, though. Conclusion? Works for me just the same as if it was hooked up directly to the printer. D) USB hard drive adapter: Well, phooey – someone “borrowed” my USB hard drive a few months ago and it has never found its way back (let this be a lesson, kiddies). OK, fine, I'll try the next best thing, a USB thumb drive. Accessed as expected (using the supplied software), so nothing really exciting, but no complaints here either. Final Conclusion? The products does everything that it says that it does, and it does it well. Just make sure that you reboot your computer after any software drive installs, and you may also have to reboot your router\modem after initial adapter installs. I had to.

Overall Review: ***How did I come up with my final ratings?*** Although I found this to be a VERY difficult product to rate (due to its “niche” nature), I finally concluded that since it does everything that it claims to do, that the only thing to consider (regarding the final rating) would be the price. Currently it can be had for under 90 bucks with rebate, and at this price I would consider this a 5-star product. It's really the Swiss Army Knife of networking. While it's not something that you might use every day, it IS something that's gonna come in darned handy at some time or another, especially if you're a geek like me. If you're still not convinced, I urge you to go to the Netgear website and download the owner's manual to see what you're getting (and getting into). It's available in the ever-popular .pdf format. To do so (once on the Netgear web page): Support → Support or Home Products → in the “search for products” box type “XAUB2511” → download to your heart's content I sincerely hope that this review helps someone, somewhere, at some time. Thanks!