Verified Owner
Ownership: 1 month to 1 year
Works Well5/27/2020 5:11:26 AM

Pros: - Good quality video - Wide angle lens - Linux-compatible (Works for me on Ubuntu 18.04 out of the box with no need for driver install or special configuration.) - Included physical door to block video for security. (Nothing for microphone, but you can easily unplug the USB.) - Clever monitor mount fits well on even monitors with sloping backs like mine.

Cons: - Took a long time to ship from Hong Kong, (But that was during the start of the quarantine when a lot of things were very delayed and webcams especially hard to get.)

Overall Review: I'm using it with Skype in Linux, and it works well.

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful. Did you? 
Good on the details with surprisingly simple design3/23/2015 3:02:54 PM

Pros: * Good quality materials and construction * Well thought-out design with spaces to hide cables and allow airflow Great for making a well-cooled, but quiet machine with lots of 140mm fan options (larger fans = most airflow for least noise. 140mm is the biggest fan you'll find on normal PC cases.) - Mounting for a large up to 280 mm water cooling radiator and/or two 140mm fans on top, also has holes for 120mm fans and 240mm radiator - Second mounting for a 240mm radiator or two 120mm fans at the front of the case. - Mounting for 140mm intake fan at the bottom of the case. (Bottom intake fan rests right against the holes at the bottom of the case. Having the low pressure intake side of the fan right up against the case holes like that creates some noise, but the only case I've seen with a stand-off hood to solve that issue is the *much* more expensive Cosmos 1000) - Bottom mounting for PSU with large fan intake. I used a PC Power & Cooling Silencer MK III. - Comes with two very quiet 120mm fans pre-mounted, one on the front for intake, the other on the back for exhaust. The front mount can hold up to two 120mm fans, or the aforementioned 240mm radiator and associated 120mm intake fans. - The side plate also has a 140mm fan mounting available. Other nice details: - Hole in the MB tray for easy access to the rear mountings of CPU coolers. - Extra cubby hole for SSD back behind the MB tray next to the PSU. I didn't use it, but it's available. - Easy access thumbscrew-removable side doors on both sides. - Vertical rail mounting for 2x3.5 and 2x2.5 inch hard drives. This includes pre-installed rubber grommets for vibration damping on the 3.5 inch drives. The vertical rail is removable with thumbscrews for easy mounting, and it is positioned to give good airflow to the drives from the front panel fans. - Front USB2, USB3, audio, and power/reset switches are at the top, easily reachable for mounting on the floor or in an under-desk cabinet, as I did. - Removable semi-screen covers the bottom intake holes. It's not a real dust screen and far from being a filter, but the holes are small enough to keep out the larger chunks that might be on a floor in a floor-mount scenario. Being removable makes it easier to clean.

Cons: Mostly minor: - I would have preferred to see a legit dust screen on the bottom intakes. The one provided is better than nothing, but not great. - The behind-PSU cubby hole for a 2.5 inch drive is not ideal because there's no airflow or cooling back there. Then again, most 2.5 inch drives, especially SSDs should be fine due to low heat dissipation and the high tolerance of laptop drives. Just don't try to put a 2.5 inch non-SSD server drive back there. - The power and reset buttons feel kind of cheap and don't give good feedback when you operate them. Also, they're connected to each other, and I'd prefer if they were separated a bit. - No 3.5 inch front mount hole for card readers and the like.

Overall Review: I bought this as a new build for my wife. I made a low-mid range gaming rig with: - AMD A10-7800 CPU - R970X 4GB graphics - PC Power & Cooling Silencer MK III PSU - 1 2.5 inch SSD OS drive - 1 3.5 inch HDD storage drive - 1 DVD drive - 1 3.5inch front card reader for which I had to get a conversion plate that mounts poorly (more the fault of the conversion plate, but I wish the case had come with a proper front 3.5 inch bay.) - Relatively low-end CPU air cooler installed, but I tested my old Zalman CNPS9700 (it's a large air cooler) for fit in this case and it was fine. The case makes it fairly easy to hide almost all cables behind the motherboard plate, and there are well-placed and well-sized holes to bring them in/out from behind there. The one exception is the vertical post mount for the hard drives. I had to wrench the SATA power cables around more than I wanted to to get both drives connected with the HDD on the top inside and the SSD on the lower outside. It works ok, though. I was very pleased with the variety of high-quality cooling options in a case that came at a solidly mid-range price. 140mm fans make a huge difference if you want to make things quiet without sacrificing cooling capacity. They actually cool better in most cases due to higher CFM throughput. My wife has been very pleased with this build. The case has been simple and well-made, which is exactly what we were hoping for,

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Good Hardware, Frustrating Software7/21/2014 3:43:20 PM

Pros: - Dual-band N - ARMv7-based chipset is fast - Wireless Bridge Mode capability built-in - Some nice extras like USB port that can turn it into a media server - Those extra features still work in wireless bridge mode, which is nice - Buffalo-provided software is very capable - Stock firmware is Linux-based and can be accessed at command-line with the right tricks (see Other Thoughts)

Cons: - Very difficult, if not impossible to upgrade to DD-WRT (possibly due to a firmware bug in 2.09, which might be fixed in 2.13) - Poorly written documentation that buries important points and requires a lot of guesswork. - Changing it into Wireless bridge, AP, or wireless extender mode is only possible by pushing a "mode" button on the back of the router a certain number of times. The lights don't make it terribly easy to tell what mode you're in, and it changes default IP address between certain modes.

Overall Review: I bought this intending to flash it to use it as a wireless bridge (take existing 5Ghz wireless network and turn it into wired ethernet ports for my office.) It comes with no real documentation, and the GUI interface gives no indication that wireless bridge mode is even an option, so I tried to flash it to DD-WRT. I have Buffalo firmware v2.09 on it, and I followed exactly what others had done to get this model with that firmware to flash to DD-WRT, but no success. It even went through the flash process with the progress bar and declared success, but always back to the same stock firmware. Eventually, I looked at Buffalo's site and the release notes for the newer update of firmware 2.13: they fixed a bug that prevents flashing the firmware in that version sometimes. Presumably, that means the bug existed in my device at 2.09, so I'm guessing my device is in the "sometimes" for that bug. I also noticed that they claimed the stock firmware supported wireless bridge mode, so I downloaded and picked through the very long official manual. Lo and behold, the mode button and nothing else can change it to wireless bridge mode. It was not a particularly user-friendly experience, but I did get it into wireless bridge mode and configured properly without too much trouble after that. It's working like a champ right now. If you are really set on using DD-WRT firmware, I suggest getting the WZR-600DHP2D (extra "D" on the end) That supposedly comes with a buffalo-modified version of DD-WRT preinstalled, and presumably allows upgrade to other DD-WRT versions. Newegg has it listed as out of stock as I write this, but if they don't have it in by the time you're looking, I can confirm it exists in the wild... They do price that version higher than the non-"D" version. If you want to save cash, maybe try upgrading the stock buffalo firmware on this one to 2.13 if 2.09 doesn't work for you using the webflash with DD-WRT 23503 or later. I haven't tried it, but others have credibly claimed that they were able to get this working. NOTE: If you use the special secret admin account it gives you some extra links with options like enabling telnet on the router under Advanced ->Admin -> System. That didn't help me DD-WRT the router, but it is nice to be able to access the shell. user: bufpy password: otdpopy<CurrentAdminPassword> It took many frustrating hours to get this to do what I wanted it to, which was a pretty basic wireless bridge function. Yes, I should have RT"F"M earlier, but info about basic mode changing functions shouldn't be hidden that far in the (online only) documentation. Also, there should just be an option to change the mode in the GUI itself, not just through a push-button that has to be pushed in some secret sequence. Lose two eggs for that.

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful. Did you? 
Fits wrong way, no actual PWM (4pin) support7/20/2014 12:39:20 PM

Pros: Cheap-ish for what it claims to be. Too bad it's not that

Cons: - It doesn't fit properly, you have to turn it so that it hangs off the top of your card and doesn't cool ram or power components at all. It looks like it should go sideways, but in that position it hits other expansion slots. I bought it for an ATI 6870, but putting it up against an Nvidia Ti560, it wouldn't have fit that, either. - The fan is not 4-pin PWM compatible. Maybe I didn't read it closely enough, and that's my bad, but it does say 4-pin. The 4-pin is a molex connector adaptor that does come with it, but only has two pins connected. To me, saying 4-pin is very misleading. - The fins on one corner, and the last one along an edge were bent. It comes with little rubber grommets that fit into those pins to attach the fan, so I had to pull the corners of the last two fins off completely to get that mounted. Fortunately, they're thin and cheap so easy to remove.

Overall Review: Very disappointed. I was trying to replace just the fan on Sapphire 6870 card, but it had an odd 4-post pattern where they're all 3 that I can find, so I went for replacing the whole heatsink. It looks like I'll have to just bite the bullet and replace the whole card. I'll be getting that one from Am*zon.

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Works, good price1/12/2014 10:23:16 AM

Pros: It is simple, does its job, has a very good price, but doesn't look or feel cheap. You're not sacrificing quality or function to buy this cable. I get full 5G data rates across it when using it as an extension to another usb3.0 cable and then hub.

Cons: It doesn't have gold connectors or flashy lights... I don't really want those things.

Overall Review: If you're looking for gold-plated connectors, then you must either plan to use this outdoors near salt water or in a similarly corrosive environment, or you have chosen to show off your wealth in a very sad way. USB is a digital protocol, and with that said, 5 gigabit speed is 5 gigabit speed, no matter what you're putting in those bits. If this cable is the right length for what you need, then I recommend you buy it and save the rest of your money for something else.

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Verified Owner
Ownership: 1 day to 1 week
Does NOT work with USB 1.11/12/2014 10:12:44 AM

Pros: Small, looks nice, Blue LED lights for each port connected. My USB 3.0 flash drive works fine on it.

Cons: Not backwards compatible with USB 1.1 devices, including many mice and keyboards, or USB 2.0 hubs. It says it's backwards-compatible with USB2.0, not 1.1 specifically, but since USB 2.0 is itself backwards-compatible with 1.1, you may make the assumption that it's fully backwards-compatible. It's not. I got this thing, plugged in my microsoft keyboard and microsoft mouse, and they didn't work at all. I also tried to plug in my old USB 2.0 hub that I had used with that same keyboard and mouse, and got nothing. So much for "full" USB 2.0 compatibility. If it's not truly backwards-compatible, they needed to say so. I spent a substantial amount of time on Newegg trying to decide which USB 3.0 hub to buy, and there was nothing to indicate this would be as big of a failure as it is. I can't help but feel ripped off. This thing is completely useless to me and now I have to go find a better one.

Overall Review: For the sky-high price of this thing, I would not have expected them to cut corners so much on basic functionality. I guess after all these years Belkin is still not the quality brand they pretend to be. I certainly feel cheated having paid more for this name.

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Flexible, good features, reliable, cheap for Cisco8/6/2012 6:30:47 PM

Pros: - 8-port gig switch with trunking and other decent layer 2 options made by Cisco for a very reasonable price. - Seems fairly reliable, as expected from Cisco. - Can optionally power itself from another switch using power over ethernet, eliminating a power cable in a media center setup, for instance. (Does not provide POE from that port, even when plugged in, though. There's another model that does that.) - Uses a fairly small amount of power. - Supports LACP port-channels - Flexible uses, good features, and small: useful for many things.

Cons: - No CLI, SSH, Telnet, or otherwise (I'm told the SB300 series has one, no idea how close it is to IOS, though) - Oddities in the interface: To set up a trunk with multiple vlans, you have to 1. create the vlans, 2. add them to the trunk (normal so far) then 3. go to a separate page to allow the vlans on the trunk (?) That also has to be done for untagged (access) This results in behavior similar to what is available on a Cisco IOS switch, but sometimes what you have to do is very counterintuitive and obscure, and the documentation doesn't really help much at all. - CDP not really working. From the documentation and the configuration options it looks like this can support voice and data vlans for Cisco phones, and thus is must use CDP in that case, but if you connect it to an IOS based switch, you won't see it as a neighbor, nor see that switch as a neighbor from it. It appears to have some other sort of possibly non-proprietary discovery protocol as an option.

Overall Review: I bought two of these and a third one that was the same except it provided POE on four ports (from another seller that had it slightly cheaper at the time) This was part of a project to run ethernet cable to various parts of my house. I installed the POE switch in my office near my router and modem and installed these switches in my media center and my wife's office. Thus far, they've worked brilliantly running off of POE from the main switch. My day job is as a network engineer, I have about 6 years experience in that, a CCNP and CCNP-Voice, among other certifications, and am working on my CCIE NOTE: These switches are not suitable for a CCIE or other certification lab. They do not use IOS, NexusOS, or anything else that will help you in any way on those exams, because the "small business" line interface is entirely different.

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Update: Died after 6 mos@ rated settings11/26/2008 12:20:07 PM

Pros: Works pretty well, at first. SPD values detected correctly by my board. (note this does not set voltage)

Cons: I bought this in April and installed it on a new build I designed for stability. (Gigabyte X48T-DQ6) After adjusting the voltage to the required 1.8v, this ran fine at DDR1333. (the rated setting) Memtest86 could run the full set of tests for an hour with only one or two detected errors on the inversion test. This was worse than any other machine I had with good ram, but quite usable. Three months later, the board suddenly lost the settings and went to default voltage. This caused memory errors that made the board think the BIOS was corrupted. The automatic BIOS recovery would run on each boot, and Windows and Linux would not boot. I didn't figure out the problem until after one time the auto BIOS recovery made a mistake, and I had to send the board back in to be re-flashed at the factory. Putting voltage back to 1.8v made it usable, but I was getting more errors on memtest. Tweaking up and down showed that 1.8v was still the most stable setting, though. (continued in comments

Overall Review: Now, 6 months after install, I get frequent crashes in Windows and Linux. I tried upgrading to a 950W PSU, and no help. I started looking at this RAM again, and found that memtest86 won't even load. Memtester produces a crash. I'll probably try an RMA with OCZ's tech support (they, at least, seem to be pretty good) but honestly, I'm planning to replace this RAM with something from Patriot or another company. I don't know if they do ddr3 better, but I need something that will be stable @ 1333 and will last. This ram isn't it. P.S. the rebate is a scam. they reject your first application no matter how perfect, then you have to go to the tech support forum to the section that makes up about half of the total posts, and send all your info to a tech, who will then make them pay. It takes about 4 months at best, and if you don't have copies of _everything_ you sent in, and if it wasn't perfect the first time, then forget it. I did get my money, though, and the techs are helpful.

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful. Did you? 
Manufacturer Response:
Hello, we are sorry for the problem. Your memory is covered by our lifetime warranty, so please arrange for an RMA through the link below. While our DDR3 reliability has been excellent overall, there is no way to predict a RAM IC failure will occur after it has functioned well for 6 months. This is why we cover you with our warranty. Thank you
External Link(s):
OCZ Support Page
The Sweet Spot6/3/2008 10:24:52 AM

Pros: This is the perfect "sweet spot" processor in terms of price/performance/overclockability for a quad-core.

Cons: Intel is evil. Can't help that.

Overall Review: I got a board and ram rated to run at 1333 fsb, and was able to clock this processor to 3.0 GHz with no modifications to voltage or anything else. It runs rock-solid. I'm sure it could go much higher.

6 out of 6 people found this review helpful. Did you? 
Verified Owner
Ownership: 1 month to 1 year
Big, Heavy, and effective.6/3/2008 10:19:57 AM

Pros: It cools things down very well, and is not too loud. It has a funny mounting system that allows you to mount it facing up, down, left or right, which is helpful if you have space constraints on your board due to other heat sinks. As long as your board has reasonable space on it, it should be able to fit. Comes with a FanMate II, which you can use on other stuff if your board already supports voltage throttling as mine does.

Cons: Big and heavy, make sure your case is deep.

Overall Review: Running on a Gigabyte GA-X48T-DQ6 with Intel q6600 @ 3.0 GHz ~40 - 45 degrees C at load. Comes with a bottle of decent-looking silver thermal grease. I had my own arctic silver, so I don't know whether it's any good. I had to remove the extra heatsink from the back of the motherboard in order to mount this. This is an oddity of the motherboard, though, and not the Zalman. Any heatsink large enough to require a bracket and screws instead of pushpins will require you to remove that wierd back-board heatsink that Gigabyte uses.

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Works6/3/2008 10:08:54 AM

Pros: Does its job Quietly and Efficiently. Inexpensive. Samsung is a good name.

Cons: none

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The Premium Monitor6/3/2008 10:04:24 AM

Pros: Glossy finish, excellent color, extensive adjustment options, VGA, HDMI, and DVI inputs, NEC reliability. One more LCD monitor from NEC that has not a single dead or bad pixel. Not Even One. NEC has the best reputation in computer monitors, and after owning several over many years, I can confirm that it is well-deserved.

Cons: The colors and brightness will probably need adjustment, as the defaults will probably not be ideal for your specific environment. Fortunately, you have a lot of options, and should be able to do a good job in 10 or 15 minutes. Yeah, the speakers are tiny. Not bad for what they are, but not useful for much more than TV use. No built-in USB ports or other bells and whistles that are not display-related. Buy this if you want the best display, not the best USB hub/Speaker set.

Overall Review: This monitor has a glossy, reflective screen. It looks better than a screen with anti-glare usually, but can be a problem in certain environments with reflections. You might want to go with a glare-guard model if your workspace has that problem. While it's on, it's bright enough to overcome most glare, though.

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Verified Owner
Ownership: 1 week to 1 month
Great Board, Linux support Lacking5/2/2008 12:29:44 PM

Pros: Excellent board, huge heatsinks, very overclockable, and it runs cool. All solid capacitors and tons of energy-saving features. Excellent overclocker features in BIOS

Cons: Linux support is sorely lacking. Intel does not seem interested in producing Linux drivers for anything other than their inferior graphics chipsets. The community is working to make this up. For now, the open fakeRAID driver dmraid does not seem to work with the RAID controller on this board, and there is a minor issue with the ethernet controller that forces you to enable wake on lan in Windows, if you want to use it in Linux. Other than those two things, the board seems to work well in Ubuntu 8.04 This comes with a header for a serial port, but no actual serial port bracket. Gigabyte apparently makes one, but good luck finding a place to buy one if you live outside of Australia. A standard com bracket should do, but I haven't tried it yet.

Overall Review: The "crazy cool" heatsink on the back of the board must be removed to mount any decent kind of CPU cooler. Fortunately, Gigabyte includes the screws you need to keep the front heatsinks mounted when you remove this. The manual seems to imply that you void your warranty if you do this, though. My guess is that they'd honor the warranty anyway, but they might give you a hard time.

5 out of 7 people found this review helpful. Did you? 
Best. Case. Ever.5/2/2008 10:33:01 AM

Pros: For $200, they definitely give you $200 worth of case. Every detail of this thing seems well thought-out. Rubber seals around the side panels, soundproof foam on same, my case came with plastic protectors on the sharp parts, and most surfaces finished properly, so not too many sharp parts. The release for the side panels is a very clever lever/latch system operated from the back. Air flow is excellent, mine came with an extra fan hood like the one on the bottom of the case. It mounts right above the hard drive bays, so all you have to do is add a 120mm fan, and you will have plenty of cooling intake air going right over your hard drives. The "VGA cover" thing does nothing for air flow, but it does a very good job of hiding cables, and makes the inside look nice. The top panel and all exterior has high-quality finish. It has an HD audio header for newer high-end boards as well as AC-97 for other ones. Front door is balanced and has a soft magnetic catch, just brilliant.

Cons: If you want top-notch cooling and airflow, you really need to get that extra 120mm fan, which is not included, for hard drive cooling and an extra intake. It would be nicer if they had included the fan with the hood. The extra fan/fan hood take up the bottom two 5" bays if you do decide to install them. Not a big deal for most folks, but worth considering if for some reason you need to use more than 3 5" bays. The case is enormous. Really. Check all three dimensions, then get a tape measure and check the space where you're gonna put it before ordering if you have even the slightest doubts about space. Large inside, too, so a PSU with short cables is not advised. My PSU with average length cables and worked fine, though.

Overall Review: Cooler Master thoughtfully includes some reusable cable tie-down stick-to-surface things and a metal case (overkill) to hold your accessories. Nice rubber grip surface area on top good for placing screws and tools while working. Gigabyte X48T-DQ6 mobo, Q6600, ZALMAN CNPS9700 LED 110mm cooler, 8800GT video, 3 SATA HDDs. Plenty of space internally for large heatsinks, long PCIe cards, and such. Two holes in case you want to mount an external liquid cooler. Case is so quiet that I accidentally turned it off once, thinking I was turning it on.

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful. Did you? 
Verified Owner
Ownership: 1 week to 1 month
Works well5/2/2008 10:02:45 AM

Pros: High capacity for the price. Good software that will give you all sorts of details on power consumption and analysis of the power coming in. This UPS can support an SNMP add-in card for remote management over a network. Extremely useful in certain applications.

Cons: The "wiring fault" indicator light alerted me to a ground fault in my outlet, but no indication of this fault or what it was came up in the software interface.

Overall Review: I still have another Belkin UPS for my old computer, and it has worked excellently for about 5 years, with one (very easy) battery replacement.

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Durable, fast, and good price5/2/2008 9:56:03 AM

Pros: Long life expectancy: This has one of the highest shock tolerance ratings (possibly the highest) of all native SATA drives. Only SAS and SCSI drives beat it. The difference between the MTBF rating and actual life expectancy is generally attributed to shocks taken by the drive, so this is important. The ES.2 drives are designed for low-end servers, but are also perfect for desktops that value stability. Performance: 32 megs of cache, native SATA, seek times of a modern drive, 'nuff said. Price: Not much more expensive than standard 7200 rpm workstation drives, with much higher quality. 5 Year warranty.

Cons: Requires a SATA power connection as well as the SATA port, or a $3 adapter to change 4-pin Molex to SATA. Most modern power supplies only come with 4 SATA power connectors on two cables, which can be a problem if you are building a RAID and use one up for your optical drive. Really, though, there are no cons.

Overall Review: Spend the extra $20-$30 on this drive over the 7200.11, you won't regret it. This all applies to the 250 gig ES.2 model as well. I use seagate ES drives for replacements on a large network (~120 machines) of 911 emergency call servers at work, and have not been disappointed yet, which is good, because some sites are an 8 hour drive away. WD is the only other manufacturer that I know of making SATA drives that are designed for server use right now, and I know my experience is unusual, but I've never had a drive by them that didn't fail long before it should have.

15 out of 15 people found this review helpful. Did you? 
Durable, fast, and good price5/2/2008 9:49:28 AM

Pros: Long life expectancy: This has one of the highest shock tolerance ratings (possibly the highest) of all native SATA drives. Only SAS and SCSI drives beat it. The difference between the MTBF rating and actual life expectancy is generally attributed to physical shocks taken by the drive, so this is important. The ES.2 drives are designed for low-end servers, but are also perfect for desktops that value stability. Performance: 32 megs of cache, native SATA, seek times of a modern drive, 'nuff said. Price: Not much more expensive than standard 7200 rpm workstation drives, with much higher quality. 5 Year warranty.

Cons: Requires a SATA power connection as well as the SATA port, or a $3 adapter to change 4-pin Molex to SATA. Most modern power supplies only come with 4 SATA power connectors on two cables, which can be a problem if you are building a RAID and use two up to run a cable to your optical drive. Really, though, there are no cons.

Overall Review: Spend the extra $15 or so on this drive, you won't regret it. This all applies to the 500 gig ES.2 model as well. I use seagate ES drives for replacements at work on a large network (~120 machines, mirrored RAID each) of 911 emergency call servers, and have not been disappointed yet, which is good, because some sites are an 8 hour drive one way. WD is the only other manufacturer that I know of making SATA drives that are designed for server use right now, and I know my experience is unusual, but I've never had a drive by them that didn't fail long before it should have.

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful. Did you? 
Does the job5/2/2008 9:22:29 AM

Pros: Works.

Cons: none

Overall Review: Gonna need a lot of these if you're building a RAID 5 out of SATA drives, for instance.

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Quiet and Powerful5/2/2008 9:20:40 AM

Pros: Single 12v rail has plenty of juice for hungry graphics cards. Its sound is easily drowned out by the other fans in my case, which isn't saying much.

Cons: It's a little longer than average, and has no modular cables.

Overall Review: Contrary to what a previous reviewer said, mine came with two PCIe 6-pin connectors, one of which could be snapped down to 6 from an 8-pin PCI connector.

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful. Did you? 
beautiful and long-lasting4/8/2008 10:35:37 AM

Pros: Big, bright, and beautiful. Not too much bleed on a dark screen, far less than the average for this size LCD. Not One Single Bad Pixel. The VGA and DVI inputs can be used concurrently, and it's smart enough to go back to the last one you used, or switch over if one is inactive. There is a headphone jack on the front, very convenient. Great price for the quality.

Cons: Small speakers. You didn't buy this for the speakers, did you? No HDMI, so computers only. (my review of the NEC 22" model with HDMI coming soon) No USB hub. This monitor was built to be a top-notch computer display, and nothing else.

Overall Review: Buy your DVI cable from Newegg, search for cables. You can get a good one for $7. I have seen retail stores charge as much as 10 times that, and theirs are often DOA! This replaced an NEC CRT that I used heavily for 13 years! The picture never degraded, and the only reason I replaced it was an intermittent flicker that it picked up after it was exposed to some bad power. NEC has a long reputation as the "status" monitor. This reputation is well earned.

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Does what it's supposed to do4/8/2008 9:43:40 AM

Pros: 2 gigs of this memory dropped right in and greatly improved performance on my wife's tiny laptop.

Cons: none

Overall Review: I ended up having to install a pair of these, rather than just one, as the laptop wouldn't boot with only a single stick, or with this one combined with an older one. I am almost 100% certain that this was an issue with the laptop, not the memory. Installed on Averatec 1020ED. No timing tweaks or overclocking options are available to test on that machine.

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful. Did you? 
Excellent all-around printer4/8/2008 9:38:07 AM

Pros: Speed, Duplex printing, Networking, and the Lexmark name for reliability for $250. Upgraded from a Lexmark E210 I used and abused for 5+ years and was always reliable. Cheap after-market toner cartridge replacements are reliable, readily available and greatly reduce the cost per page. The driver is nice in both Windows and Linux. The web interface for the printer is user-friendly and contains good statistics, diagnostics, and advanced workgroup functions, if you need them.

Cons: They removed the proper linux drivers from their website. Looking for Ubuntu drivers gives you drivers and an installer script that do not work at all with Ubuntu. Fortunately, they used to have the right ones up, (they are still there under different linux distros) and you can find them with a quick google search.

Overall Review: Duplex function works by spitting out the page partway, then pulling it back in for another pass. A little disconcerting at first, but it is surprisingly fast, and the sides stay lined up perfectly. Navigating the Lexmark site (as opposed to searching google) only lets you see the E250d. Fortunately, the Windows driver listed there works for both.

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful. Did you? 
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